Progress has been made in the roll-out of the Polish CTC (continuous transaction control) system, Krajowy System of e-Faktur. Earlier this year, the Ministry of Finance published a draft act, which is still awaiting adoption by parliament to become law. Draft e-invoice specifications have been released and there has been a public consultation on the CTC system.

In June, the Ministry of Finance announced it had reviewed all comments submitted by the public and Polish ministers on the CTC system and decided to take the following actions:

In the announcement, the Minister outlined the benefits of adopting the CTC system for taxpayers. These include: quicker VAT refunds; security of the stored invoice in the tax authority’s database until the end of the mandatory storage period; certainty about the invoice delivery to the recipient through the CTC platform and therefore quicker invoice payments; automation of the invoice processing and exchange due to the adoption of a standardized e-invoice format.

In addition, as a result of the new e-invoicing rules upcoming changes in the SLIM VAT 2 package will trigger further relief measures, e.g. around the handling of duplicates and corrective invoices.

The Polish authorities are making good progress in the implementation of the Krajowy System e-Faktur. It is positive to see that the public consultation has proven useful in defining next steps and the authorities’ intent for transparency and timely documentation will hopefully continue throughout the entire CTC roll-out.

Want to know more

To find out more about what we believe the future holds, download Trends: Towards Continuous Transaction Controls.

Moving goods from one place to another is a quintessential part of business. Manufacturers, wholesalers, transporters, retailers and consumers all need to carefully orchestrate the shipping and handling of raw materials, parts, equipment, finished goods and other products to keep business flowing. This supply chain harmony is what makes production and trade possible in society.

In Canada, the United States and most European countries, tax administrations don’t intervene much in these trade processes. Until recently, the same could be said about most countries of Latin America. But, with the rise and expansion of electronic invoicing mandates in the region, this is rapidly changing.

Most governments with mature e-invoicing mandates are now recognizing that these mechanisms and government platforms can be used as vehicles to understand where, what, how and when goods are being moved. The traditional electronic invoice, is no longer enough – and tax authorities are requiring businesses to report goods movements in real-time.

The implications are serious too. Goods moved on public roads without those documents are very likely to be seized by the authorities, and the owners and transporters will be subject to fines and other sanctions.

Brazil and Mexico lead the way

The country with the most sophisticated system in place is arguably Brazil. The MDF-e (or Manifesto Eletrônico de Documentos Fiscais) is a mandatory document required by the tax administration in order to audit the movement of goods in Brazil.

This purely digital document combines the information of an electronic invoice (NF-e) and the electronic documents that hauling companies issue to their clients (CT-e). This system became mandatory in 2014 and has since been expanded and modernized with a vast grid of electronic sensors and transponders placed in the public highways of Brazil, intended to ensure that every truck moving goods already has the corresponding MDF-e, NF-e and CT-e. In most cases, the authorities don’t need to stop the trucks to verify the existence of the document.

Mexico recently issued a new resolution requiring taxpayers delivering goods, or simply redistributing them, to have the corresponding authorization from the tax administration (SAT). Products delivered by road, rail, air or waterways need to have what is known as the CFDI with the Supplement of Carta Porte.

CFDI is the acronym for an electronic invoice in Mexico. That supplement of Carta Porte is a new attachment to the electronic invoice of transfer (Traslado) issued by the owners delivering products or to the CFDI of Income (Ingresos) issued by the hauling companies. Carta Porte will provide all the details about the goods being transported, the truck or other means being used, the time of delivery, route, destination, purchaser, transporter and other information. This new mandate will become effective on 30 September 2021. As is in Brazil, noncompliance with this mandate will result in hefty penalties.

E-transport elsewhere in LatAm

Chile also has a mandate requiring the delivery of goods to be pre-authorized by the tax administration. These tax authorized documents are locally known as Guias de Despacho (or dispatch guides) and since January 2020 they can only be issued in an electronic format.

There are some exceptions where the dispatch guide can be issued temporarily on a paper format by certain taxpayers. Also, in cases of contingency, taxpayers may be authorized to issue paper versions of the guide; however, that will not exempt the issuer of regularizing the process once the contingency is complete.

The content of the dispatch guide will vary depending on who issues it and the purpose of the delivery (sales, consignment, returns, exports, internal transfers etc.) but in general, delivery of goods in Chile without the authorized dispatch guide will be subject to penalties from the tax administration (SII).

Argentina has a federal level VAT and a provincial level gross revenue tax. To control tax evasion, both levels of governments exercise certain levels of control in the process of dispatching goods within their jurisdictions.

The tax authority’s system for controlling the flow of goods in public ways is not as encompassing as in Brazil, Chile and Mexico, but it is getting closer. Only the provinces of Buenos Aires, Santa Fe and Mendoza, plus the City of Buenos Aires, require authorization from the fiscal authority to move goods that originated in, or are destined to, their jurisdictions. For that, they require the COT (or Transport Operations Code) where all the data related to the products, means of transport and other information is included once the authorization is provided. The provinces of Salta, Rio Negro and Entre Rios are working on similar regulations.

At federal level, the AFIP (Federal tax administration) only requires pre-authorization for the delivery of certain products such as meat and cereals. But at this level too, the regulatory environment is changing.

The AFIP, along with the Ministry of Agriculture and the Ministry of Transportation have issued a joint resolution 5017/2021 that mandates the use of a digital bill of lading (Carta Porte Electronica) whenever there is a transfer of agricultural products on public roads in Argentina. This change will become effective on 1 November 2021. In 2022, this federal requirement may expand to other products.

LatAm sets the scene for electronic invoicing trends

The requirement of authorization for moving goods in LatAm is not limited to the largest economies of the region. Smaller countries with electronic invoicing systems have expanded, or are in the process of expanding their mandates to require taxpayers to inform the tax authority, before goods are moved as result of a sale or any other internal distribution.

For instance, Peru requires the Guias de Remision from taxpayers before they start the delivery of their products. This electronic document should be informed to and authorized by the tax administration (SUNAT) using the digital format established for that purpose and will include all the information about the product delivered, issuer, recipient, means of transport, dates and more.

Uruguay has the ‘e-Remitos’ which is an electronic document authorized by the tax administration (DGI). It is required for any physical movement of goods in Uruguay. As in other countries, this document will provide all the information about the goods being transported, the means used, the issuer, the recipient and additional data. It is electronically delivered and authorized by the tax administration using the XML schemas established for that purpose.

Lastly, in Ecuador the tax administration (SRI) requires the ‘Guias de Remision’ (Delivery Guide) for any goods to be transported legally inside the country. As the infrastructure to support the electronic invoice is not fully developed in Ecuador, in some cases the tax administration allows the taxpayer to comply with this part of the mandate by having the electronic invoice issued by the retailer delivering the goods to his clients. Even though Colombia and Costa Rica do not require a separate electronic document to authorize the transport of goods, it is expected that in the future, this requirement will come into effect, mirroring what has happened in many other countries of the region.

The common element of all these mandates in Latin America, is that all of them are closely knitted to the electronic invoicing system imposed in each country. They are basically seen as another module of the electronic invoice system where information regarding goods being transported by public roads, waterways, by rail or air should be submitted to the tax administration, via the XML schemas established for that purpose.

Tax administrations in the region are actively enhancing their systems to ensure that movements of goods are properly controlled in real time. In some cases, tax administrations have provided online solutions aimed at taxpayers with small numbers of deliveries. But for all other taxpayers, a self-deployed solution is required.

Enforcement of the mandate is made not only by the tax administration, but also by the police and the public roads authorities, both of which routinely seize goods for non- compliance. Since these mandates have proven to be successful to control tax avoidance and smuggling, it’s safe to say that the Remitos, Dispatch Guides, Carta Porte or COTs are here to stay for good and taxpayers doing business in Latin America have no option but to comply with this new regulatory requirement.

Take Action

To find out more about what we believe the future holds, download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls. Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to keep up-to-date with regulatory news and updates.

A current mega-trend in VAT is continuous transaction controls (CTCs), whereby tax administrations increasingly request business transaction data in real-time, often pre-authorising data before a business can progress to the next step in the sales or purchase workflow.

When a tax authority introduces CTCs, companies tend to view this as an additional set of requirements to be implemented inside ERP or transaction automation software by IT experts. This kneejerk reaction is understandable as implementation timelines tend to be short and potential sanctions for non-compliance significant.

But businesses would do better to approach these changes as part of an ongoing journey to avoid inefficiencies and other risks. From a tax authority perspective, CTCs are not a standalone exercise but part of a wider digital transformation strategy where all data that can be legally accessed for audit purposes is transmitted to them electronically.

It’s all about the data

In many tax authorities’ vision of digitization, each category of data is received at ‘organic’ intervals that follow the natural cadence of data processing by the businesses and data needs of governments.

Tax administrations use digitization to access data more conveniently, on a more granular level, and more frequently.

A business that doesn’t consider this continuum from the old world of reporting and audit to the new world of automated data exchange risks over-focusing on the ‘how’ – the orchestration of messages to and from a CTC platform – rather than keeping a close eye on the ‘why’ – transparency of business operations.

Data received quicker and in a structured, machine-exploitable format is infinitely more valuable for tax administrations as it gives them an opportunity to perform deeper analysis of both varying taxpayer and third-party sources of data.

If your business data is incomplete or faulty, you are likely exposing yourself to increased audits, as your bad data is under scrutiny and more transparent to the taxman.

Put differently, in a digitized world of tax, garbage-in will translate to garbage-out.

How to prepare for CTCS – automation is key

Many companies already have the magic formula to fix these data issues at their fingertips. Start by preparing for this wave of VAT digitization with a project to analyse internal data issues and work with upstream internal and external stakeholders – including suppliers – to fix them.

Tools designed to introduce automated controls for VAT filing processes can help achieve better insight into the upstream data issues that need ironing out. These same tools can also help you through the CTC journey by re-using data extraction and integration methods set up for VAT reporting for CTC transmission, thereby creating better data governance and keeping a connection between these two naturally linked processes.

A lot of bad data stems from residual paper-based processes such as paper or PDF supplier invoices or customer purchase orders. Taking measures now to switch to automated processes based on structured, fully machine-readable alternatives will make a big difference.

Improving invoice data is not the only challenge. With the inevitable broadening of document types to be submitted under CTC rules (from invoice to buy-side approval messages, to transport documents and payment status data) tax administrations will cross-check more and more of your data, as well as trading partners’ and third parties’ data — think financial institutions, customs, and other available data points.

Tax administrations are unlikely to stop their digitization efforts at indirect tax. Mandates to introduce The Standard Audit File for Tax (SAF-T ) and similar e-accounting requirements show how quickly countries are moving away from the old world of tax and onsite audits.

All this data, from multiple sources with strong authentication, will paint an increasingly detailed and undeniable picture of your business operations. It is just a matter of time before corporate income tax returns will be pre-filled by tax administrations who expect little to no legitimate changes from your side.

‘Substance over form’ is a popular aphorism in the world of tax. As more business applications and data streams become readily accessible by tax administrations, you need to start considering data quality and consistency as a first step towards thriving in the world of digitized tax enforcement.

Aim for more, not less, insight into your business than the taxman

In the end, tax administrations want to understand your business. They don’t just want data, they want meaningful information on what you do, why you do it, how you trade, with whom and when. This is also exactly what your owners and management want.

So the ultimate goals are the same between businesses and tax administrations – it’s just that businesses will often prioritise operational efficiency and financial objectives whereas tax administrations focus on getting the best, most objective information possible.

Tax administrations introducing CTCs as an objective may be a blessing in disguise, and there are benefits of introducing better analytics to your business to comply with tax administration requirements.

The real value lies in real-time insight into business operations and financial indicators such as cash management or supply chain weaknesses. This level of instant insight into your own business also enables you to always be one step ahead, leaving you in control of the picture your data is providing to governments.

CTCs are the natural next step on a journey to a brave new world of business transparency.

Take Action

Download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls for other perspectives on the future of tax. Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to keep up-to-date with regulatory news and developments.

 

Turkey’s e-transformation journey, which started in 2010, became more systematic in 2012. This process first launched with the introduction of e-ledgers on 1 Jan 2012 and has since reached a much wider scope for e-documents. </p

The Turkish Revenue Administration (TRA), the leader of the e-transformation process, has played an important role in encouraging companies to embrace the digitalization of tax and created a successful model for following tax-related procedures.

You can read more about Turkey’s e-transformation in our e-book Navigating Turkey’s Evolving Tax Landscape.

The process was further accelerated with new requirements for e-documents.

Latest developments and expectations in Turkey’s e-transformation

The TRA continues to widen the scope of e-documents and the types of e-documents in use are:

The digitization journey of e-documents

Many taxpayers have voluntarily adopted the new system since the TRA launched this whole process and TRA’s latest updates for e-documents are critically important to monitor for tax-related procedures.

As e-documents become more popular, any income loss arising from tax procedures will reduce. E-documents offer additional advantages for public institutions and private businesses, such as saving time, minimising costs and improving productivity. It’s certain that the scope of e-documents in Turkey will keep expanding in the future, which will affect taxpayers and tax procedures.

Take Action

Get in touch to find out how Sovos tax compliance software can help you meet your e-transformation and e-document requirements in Turkey.

Since 1993, supplies performed between Italy and San Marino have been accompanied by a set of customs obligations. These include the submission of paperwork to both countries’ tax authorities.

After the introduction of the Italian e-invoicing mandate in 2019, Italy and San Marino started negotiations to expand the use of e-invoices in cross-border transactions between the two countries. Those negotiations have finally bore fruit, and details are now available.

Building SDI connectivity to San Marino

Italy and the enclaved country of San Marino will abandon paper-based customs flows.

The Italian and Sammarinese tax authorities have decided to implement a “four-corner” model, whereby the Italian clearance platform SDI will become the access point for Italian taxpayers, while a newly created HUB-SM will be the SDI counterpart for Sammarinese taxpayers.

Cross-border e-invoices between the countries will be exchanged between SDI and HUB-SM. The international exchange system will be enforced on 1 July 2022, and a transition period will be in place between 1 October 2021 and 30 June 2022.

FatturaPA: The format of choice

HUB-SM’s technical specifications are now available for imports from Italy to San Marino, and exports from San Marino to Italy. The countries have also decided to choose FatturaPA as the e-invoice format, although content requirements for export invoices from San Marino will slightly differ from domestic Italian FatturaPA e-invoices.

The SDI and HUB-SM systems will process e-invoices to and from taxpayers connected to them, or under each country’s jurisdictions.

In other words, Italian taxpayers will send and receive cross-border invoices to or from San Marino via the SDI platform, while Sammarinese taxpayers will perform the same activities via HUB-SM.

Both platforms will deliver invoices to the corresponding taxpayers through the Destination Codes assigned by the respective tax authorities. This means HUB-SM will also assign Destination Codes for Sammarinese companies.

Integration documents for Sammarinese companies

Inspired by the Italian methodology for fiscal controls in cross-border transactions, San Marino will require Sammarinese buyers to fill out an additional integration document (similar to a “self-billing” invoice created for tax evidence reasons) upon receipt of the FatturaPA. This document will be filled out in a new XML-RSM format created by the enclave and sent to HUB-SM.

After the larger rollout of the SDI for B2B transactions in 2019, the platform has proven capable of adapting to new workflows and functionalities.

Since last year, e-purchase orders from the Italian National Health System have been exchanged through the NSO, an add-on to the SDI platform. In January 2022, the FatturaPA replaces the Esterometro as a cross-border reporting mechanism.

SDI has already debuted in the international arena through the acceptance of the e-invoices following the European Norm, which are mapped into a FatturaPA before being delivered to Italian buyers. This integration between SDI and HUB-SM might also reveal the early steps of interoperability between both tax authorities’ platforms for cross-border trade.

Take Action

Get in touch with our experts who can help you understand how SDI and HUB-SM will work together.

Download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls to find out more about the future of tax systems around the world.

The General Authority of Zakat and Tax’s (GAZT) previously published draft rules on ‘Controls, Requirements, Technical Specifications and Procedural Rules for Implementing the Provisions of the E-Invoicing Regulation’ aimed to define technical and procedural requirements and controls for the upcoming e-invoicing mandate. GAZT recently finalized and published the draft e-invoicing rules in Saudi Arabia.

Meanwhile, the name of the tax authority has changed due to the merger of the General Authority of Zakat and Tax (GAZT) and the General Authority of Customs to form the Zakat, Tax and Customs Authority (ZATCA).

The finalised rules include a change to the go live date of the second phase from 1 June 2022 to 1 January 2023. They revealed the time limit to report B2C (simplified) invoices to the tax authority´s platform for the second phase.

According to the final rules, the Saudi Arabia e-invoicing system will have two main phases.

Saudi Arabia E-Invoicing System: The First Phase

The first phase begins on 4 December 2021 and requires all resident taxpayers to generate, amend and store e-invoices and electronic notes (credit and debit notes).

The final rules state businesses must generate e-invoices and their associated notes in a structured electronic format. Data in PDF or Word format are therefore not e-invoices. The first phase does not require a specific electronic format. However, such invoices and notes must contain all necessary information. The first phase requires B2C invoices to include a QR code.

There are a number of prohibited functionalities for e-invoicing solutions for the first phase:

Saudi Arabia E-Invoicing System: The Second Phase

The second phase will bring the additional requirement for taxpayers to transmit e-invoices in addition to electronic notes to the ZATCA.

The final rules state the second phase will begin 1 January 2023 and will be rolled-out in different stages. A clearance regime is prescribed for B2B invoices while B2C invoices must be reported to the tax authority platform within 24 hours of issuance.

As a result of the second phase requirements, the Saudi e-invoicing system will be classified as a CTC e-invoicing system from 1 January 2023. All e-invoices must be issued in UBL based XML format. Tax invoices can be distributed in XML or PDF/A-3 (with embedded XML) format. Taxpayers must distribute simplified invoices (i.e. B2C) in paper form.

In the second phase, a compliant e-invoicing solution must have the following features:

The second stage will furthermore bring additional prohibited functionalities for e-invoicing solutions on top of requirements mentioned in the first phase:

What’s next for Saudi Arabia’s e-invoicing system?

After publishing the final rules, the ZATCA is organising workshops to inform relevant stakeholders in the industry.

Some of the details remain unclear at this point, however the Saudi authorities have been very successful in communicating the long-term goals of the implementation of its e-invoicing system, as well as making clear documentation available and providing opportunities for feedback on the documentation published for each phase. We expect provision of the necessary guidance within the near future.

Take Action

Contact us to discuss your Saudi Arabia VAT requirements. In addition, to find out more about what we believe the future holds, download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls.

The Turkish Revenue Administration (TRA) has published updated guidelines on the cancellation and objection of e-fatura and e-arsiv invoice. Two different guidelines are updated: guidelines on the notification of cancellation and objection of e-fatura and guidelines on the notification of cancellation and objection of e-arsiv.

The updated guidelines inform taxable persons about the new procedures for objection against an issued e-fatura and e-arsiv invoice. And how this must be notified to the TRA. Due to changes in the objection procedure, the e-arsiv schema has also changed. There has not yet been a change in the e-fatura schema, however it could also change in the near future. The updated guidelines state that the TRA platform can be used to notify the TRA about objection requests made against an issued e-fatura and e-arsiv invoice.

Why are the updated guidelines important?

From July 2021, electronically issued documents won’t be mentioned in the so called ‘BA and BS forms’. The BA and BS forms are generated to periodically report issued or received invoices when a total invoice amount is 5.000 TRY or more. All limited liability and joint stock companies are obliged to create and submit the forms to the TRA even if they don’t have any invoices to report.

The TRA recently published a new provision stating that electronically issued documents will not be shown in BA and BS forms and instead will be reported directly to the TRA in the clearance (e-fatura) and reporting(e-arsiv) process. Considering that the TRA receives the invoice data for electronically issued invoices in real-time, relieving taxpayers from reporting invoices through BA and BS forms creates a more efficient system in which the relevant data will be collected only once from taxpayers.

At its current stage, e-documents won’t be mentioned in these forms. However, in order for the TRA to have accurate invoice data about each taxpayer, it needs to be notified which are the final invoices and disregard any objected or cancelled documents when evaluating taxpayer data.

Although the cancellation process is already performed through the TRA platform for basic e-fatura and e-arsiv, objection requests are made externally (through a notary, registered letter or registered e-mail system), meaning the TRA does not have visibility of all objections. There could therefore be a risk that the TRA considers a cancelled document (due to objection) as issued which could result in discrepancies between the taxpayer records and the data that the TRA considers relevant for tax collection.

Therefore, taxpayers must now notify the TRA about objection requests to avoid any discrepancies between their records and BA and BS forms. The final goal of this application is that the BA and BS forms will be completely auto populated by the TRA in future.

How will the new process work?

According to the Turkish Commercial Code, any objections or cancellation requests must be made within eight days. Suppliers and buyers can raise an objection request which must be made externally (through a notary, registered letter or registered e-mail system) and registered in the TRA system.

For e-arsiv application, there are two ways for suppliers to notify the TRA about the objection request. They can either use the e-arsiv schema (automated) or register the request in the TRA portal. Buyers can see this request on the TRA platform and may respond, although they are not obliged to. Because e-self-employment receipts are also reported through e-arsiv application, the same objection rules apply.

For e-fatura, since there is no change in the schema, it is not possible for suppliers or buyers to notify the TRA using e-fatura schema. Currently, they can only notify the TRA about e-fatura objections through the TRA platform. Taxpayers can also respond to objection requests only through the platform.

What’s next?

The TRA has taken a step towards the digitalization of cancellation and objection requests. However, there is still not an automated way to perform these actions. Before the digitized objection process becomes reality in the country, the authorities must take a more sophisticated approach towards automating the process as well as introducing or amending applicable legislation.

Take Action

Get in touch to find out how Sovos tax compliance software can help you meet your e-transformation and e-document requirements in Turkey.

The Colombian electronic invoicing system is reaching maturity level. Since its inception in 2018, Colombia has been steadily consolidating and expanding the mandate to make it more stable, reliable and comprehensive.

As a result of the enactment of the recent Resolution 000013/2021, the Colombian tax administration (DIAN), officially expanded the electronic invoicing mandate to also include payroll transactions. This expansion follows the pattern established by Mexico, Brazil and other countries that already expanded the electronic invoicing mandate to payroll transactions as well.

The Support Document for Electronic Payroll is known locally in Colombia as Documento Soporte de Nomina Electronica or also simply as Nomina Electronica. It is a new digital document intended to support and validate the payroll related costs and deductions of income tax and the VAT credits (if applicable) when businesses make payments resulting from labor, legal, and other similar types of relations (pensions).

In simple terms, labour cost transactions should be reported under this new digital system for them to be valid. This is whenever employers make payments for wages, salaries, reimbursements, pensions etc.

Who is required to comply with the electronic payroll mandate?

Employers paying wages under a labor relation, where payments are reported as expenses for income tax purposes or as deductible taxes for VAT, need to comply. However, there are important exceptions derived from that legal framework. For instance, public offices, non-for-profit entities or taxpayers under the simplified regime are not currently required to comply. Consequently, they do not need to use such payments for deductions of income tax or VAT.

Schedule of deployment

The DIAN established an implementation schedule based on the number of employees the taxpayer has in the payroll. There are four stages or groups subject to the following deadlines:

Group Deadline to start the generation and remittance of the document Number of employees
From Up to
1 1 September 2021 More than 250 employees101
2 1 October 2021 101 250
3 1 November 2021 11 100
4 1 December 2021 1 10

Deadline for remittance

As the Nomina Electronica is required to be reported monthly, the payments for each month should be reported by the 10th day of the next month as a result. The adjustment notes should be reported within the same deadline, once they have been made by the employer.

Reporting elements of the electronic payroll mandate

There are two basic types of reports that are parts of this mandate: the Support Document of the electronic payroll, and – when necessary – the Adjustment Note.

Support Document of Electronic Payroll or Nomina Electronica

This electronic document contains the information supporting the payments made to employees as wages and other compensations, deductions and the difference between them made by the employer, as reported in the payroll. The employer must then generate and transmit the document to the DIAN using the XML format established in the technical documentation included in the regulation 000037/2021.

Adjustment Notes

In this mandate there are no credit notes as we know them in the electronic invoice system of Colombia. However, when an employer needs to make corrections to the Support Document of Electronic Payroll reported to the DIAN, it can issue what we know as Adjustment Notes (or Notas de Ajuste) where the employer will be allowed to correct any value previously reported to the DIAN via the Nomina Electronica.

Content and structure of the reports

Employers must submit reports to the DIAN individualised for each beneficiary receiving payments from the employers. As a result, the report requires the provision of some mandatory information for the DIAN to validate. This includes the proper identification of the report itself, the reporting party, in addition to the employees, wages or other payments employees, date, numbering, software etc.

Another mandatory information element that is worth mentioning is the CUNE or Unique Code of Electronic Payroll Support Document. This is a unique identifier for each Electronic Payroll Support Document. It will allow exact identification of each report or the Adjustment Notes issued after it. However, there is some additional optional information that can be provided depending on the needs or convenience of the employer making the report.

From a technical perspective, neither the Support Document of the Electronic Payroll nor the Adjustment Notes are based on the UBL 2.1 structure used in Colombia for the electronic invoice. This is because the UBL standard does not include modules for payroll transactions or reports. Therefore, the DIAN has based its architecture in a different XML standard. Each report requires a digital signature. For that, the taxpayer can use the same digital certificate used for signing electronic invoices.

Generation, transmission and validation

The current regulations do not require that the Nomina Electronica or the Adjustment Notes should be generated by a particular software solution or by a software provider authorized by the DIAN. Taxpayers have the option to generate the report using their own solution. That is a market solution or a solution that the DIAN will provide for small taxpayers. However, all reports should strictly follow the technical documentation issued by the DIAN within the Resolution 000037/2021. The remittance of those documents is electronic, using the webservices specified by the DIAN.

After making the transmission, the DIAN then validates the document. They will then report back the corresponding application response to the taxpayer, indicating its acceptance and validation. Only then, will the amounts reported in the payroll document are valid expenses for the deduction.

Penalties and sanctions

Non-compliance with electronic payroll in Colombia will be subject to the same fines and penalties established for not complying with the electronic invoicing mandate, as defined in Art. 652-1 of the Tax Code of Colombia (Estatuto Tributario). But the most important implication of non-compliance is that any payment not reported by the employer, will not be allowed as expenses for income tax or VAT purposes when applicable.

Take Action

Speak to our experts about your tax requirements in Colombia and keep up to date with the changing VAT compliance landscape by downloading VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls.

An amendment in the General Communiqué No. 509 has announced healthcare service providers and taxpayers providing medical supplies and medicines or active substances must use the e-invoice application from 1 July 2021.

The mandated scope for transition to e-invoice and e-arşiv invoice applications in the healthcare industry

Published in the Official Gazette the implementation will cover healthcare service providers who have signed contracts with the Social Security Institution (SSI) and all taxpayers providing medicines and active substances and medical supplies.

This includes:

The transition process to e-invoice and e-arşiv invoice applications in the healthcare industry

Within this scope, organisations must use the e-invoice application as of 1 July. Organisations signing contracts with SSI after this date must use e-invoice prior to their issue of invoices to SSI.

From 1 January 2020 all organisations included in the e-invoice application scope have to apply the e-arşiv invoice on the date of e-invoice application. Any healthcare organisations included in the amendment will then have to apply the e-arşiv invoice on 1 July.

What are the benefits of e-invoice and e-arşiv invoice transition to the healthcare industry?

The digitisation process will minimise physical contact, a significant benefit following the Covid-19 outbreak. Furthermore, organisations will no longer have to prepare or store physical documents as they are stored electronically.

For organisations that issue invoices to SSI, transactions such as payment terms will become faster and more efficient via the e-invoice and e-arşiv invoice applications. In addition to the transfer of all invoice-related processes to the digital environment.

Organisations that carry out the e-issuance process via the TRA Portal or via a third-party integrator will benefit from easy access to documents, improved efficiency, and business continuity as a result.

Take Action

Get in touch to find out how Sovos tax compliance software can help you meet your e-transformation and e-document requirements in Turkey.

Italy postpones e-document legislation until 2022. In September 2020, Italy introduced major changes to the country’s rules on the creation and preservation of electronic documents. These new requirements were expected to be enforced on 7 June 2021 however the Agency for Digital Italy (AGID) has now decided to postpone the introduction of the new rules until 1 January 2022.

The new ‘Guidelines for the creation, management, and preservation of electronic documents’ (“Guidelines”) regulate different aspects of an electronic document. By following the Guidelines, businesses benefit from the presumption that their electronic documents will provide full evidence in court.

The postponement of the introduction of the Guidelines is a reaction from the AGID to claims of local organizations who have particularly expressed concern about the obligation to associate metadata with e-documents. The Guidelines set forth an extensive list of metadata fields for keeping alongside e-documents in a way that will enable interoperability.

Metadata requirements modified

In addition to delaying the introduction of the new e-document legislation, the AGID has also modified metadata requirements. They included new pieces of metadata and changing the description of some fields. The AGID has also corrected references – especially to standards – and rephrased statements to clarify some obligations.

The updated Guidelines and their corresponding Appendices are available on the AGID website.

Take Action

Get in touch to discuss e-invoicing requirements in Italy.

Russia introduces a new e-invoicing system for traceability of certain goods on 1 July 2021. Federal Law No. 371-FZ will amend the Russian Tax Code to introduce the new procedure for the traceability system, which will bring the introduction of mandatory e-invoicing for taxpayers dealing with traceable goods.

Since its introduction, B2B e-invoicing in Russia has remained voluntary. However, this is changing as of this summer when the issuance and acceptance of e-invoices will be mandatory for taxpayers trading goods subject to the traceability system.

What is the traceability system?

The traceability system aims to monitor the movement of certain goods imported into Russia and the Eurasian Economic Union (EAEU). In the scope of the traceability system, each consignment of goods is assigned a registration number during import. This is then controlled at all transaction stages. Businesses within the scope of this new traceability system will need to include the registration number in invoices and primary accounting documents. They must also provide information on the transactions involving the traceable goods through VAT returns and related transaction reports.

Legal entities and individual businesses participating in the circulation of traceable goods are in scope of the traceability requirements. From 1 July 2021, invoices for these goods must be electronic. Buyers of goods subject to traceability must accept invoices in electronic form. Furthermore, the new requirement for mandatory electronic invoices for sales of traceable goods doesn’t apply to export/re-export sales and B2C sales.

What type of goods are subject to the traceability requirements?

The goods included in the list of traceable goods are currently:

What’s next for Russian regulation of electronic documents?

Considering that by the end of 2024 Russia aims to have 95% of invoices and 70% of waybills in electronic form, it’s likely more digitization changes are coming. The digitization of accounting records is another area the Russian tax authority is making progress on. It would therefore not come as a surprise to see more changes in the Russian legislation in the next couple of years.

Take Action

Get in touch to discuss the July 2021 e-invoicing requirements in Russia. Download VAT Trends to discover more about CTCs and how governments across the globe are enacting complex new policies to enforce VAT mandates.

It’s good to see light at the end of the tunnel. Nonetheless, it’s too little, too late for many smaller – but also plenty of larger – companies. Thousands couldn’t weather the storm because they were particularly dependent on human contact. Others were affected disproportionally simply because COVID-19 hit them just as they traversed a difficult period in their life cycle. As we see the first successes of anti-COVID-19 vaccines, businesses and markets are gaining confidence that by the last quarter of 2021, countries will be back at a new cruising speed. With a few notable exceptions, many of the world’s strongest economies will take years to recover from the aftermath.

Internet to the rescue – but flaws remain

As with all crises, the past year has accentuated weaknesses and accelerated failures. Whilst it must be acknowledged that the COVID-19 crisis would have been far worse without the internet and the current state of technology adoption worldwide, remaining pockets of legacy processes where companies were lagging in their digital transformation have become highlighted as employees struggled to balance health concerns with the imperative to keep things running in deserted offices and data centers.

One area where inefficiencies have been exposed is on-premises software. Many companies have started adopting cloud-based software to support different categories of workflows and connections with trading partners; however, many larger companies have been reluctant to move core enterprise systems – such as ERPs, logistics or reservation systems – to the cloud. The reason behind this reluctance is often that legacy systems have been highly customized. Whilst many enterprise software vendors offer public-cloud versions that present many benefits over on-premises deployment in theory, the practical challenges of adapting organizations and processes to ‘canned’ workflows designed around standard best practices have often outweighed them.

Another set of challenges are more intricate. Manual processes still dominate in order and invoice management across companies of all sizes globally. Where workflow software allows accounting personnel to access the system remotely, approvals and postings could be managed from home offices, but the prevalence of paper in many vendor and customer relationships still required people to manage scanning, printing, and mailing or – yes – faxing key documents from offices with limited access.

These problems will be harder to overcome, as expensive industrial-strength machines for the processing of paper documents cannot easily be put in home offices. The answer to this challenge doesn’t lie in creative ways to convert people’s kitchens into scan or print centers, but in finally taking the big leap towards end-to-end data integration.

The good, the bad and the ugly of tax as an automation driver

Interestingly, if COVID-19 isn’t enough of a reason to take that automation leap, businesses can expect a helping hand from tax administrations. Many countries had already started large-scale programs to push continuous transaction controls (CTCs). Such as mandatory real-time clearance of digital invoices. The current global health crisis is pushing tax administrations to accelerate these programs. We have seen announcements of plans towards such compulsory e-invoicing or digital reporting of accounting data in countries like France, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. In addition to several countries including Poland and Slovakia who stated their intent to follow in the footsteps of countries in Latin America and also European frontrunners like Italy and Turkey. Even in Germany, which has long resisted the call of CTCs, a significant political party has proposed decisive action in this direction.

These initiatives are still often motivated by the need to close tax gaps. However the need for resilience in revenue collection is clearly another driver. Also, examples from countries like Brazil have shown that CTCs massively improve governments’ ability to track and monitor the economic effects of a crisis down to the smallest sectoral detail. This gives them granular data that can be used for surgical fiscal policy intervention to guide the most severely affected activities through a crisis.

With all circumstances conspiring to give businesses a reason to get across that last mile towards full automation – the interface between their and their trading partners’ sales and purchasing operations – you would think that companies are now putting plans in place to get ready for a fully digital, much more resilient set of processes and organizational structures.

Unfortunately, the way that CTC mandates get rolled out and the way that companies respond to them have historically rather slowed down investment in business process automation and the adoption of modern cloud-based enterprise software.

CTC mandates are unbelievably diverse, ranging from a full online second set of accounting books to be maintained through – among other things – additional classification of supplies in the government-hosted system in Greece, to a completely different setup including service providers and transaction payment reporting being designed in France. Representatives from China are talking about blockchain-based invoicing controls, whilst countries like Poland and Saudi Arabia prepare for centralized, government-run invoice exchange networks. Mandate deadlines tend to be too short, and tax administrations make countless structural adjustments – each typically also with short deadlines and only available in local language – during implementation periods and for years thereafter.

Tax administrations could however claim with some legitimacy that deadlines are always too short, almost regardless of how much transition time taxpayers are granted, because many businesses structurally prepare too late. The global trend towards CTCs, SAF-T and similar mandates has been apparent to companies for years, yet many are ill-prepared; particularly many multinational businesses continue to consider that VAT compliance is a matter to be resolved by local subsidiaries, which step by step creates a massive web of localized procedures which rather than corresponding to corporate best practices were designed by tax administration offices.

Creating a virtuous circle towards tax automation during Covid-19

Which brings us back to why companies aren’t adopting flashy new releases of enterprise software packages in public cloud mode. Or further automating their trading partner exchanges, more quickly. All parties in this equation want the same thing. That is seamless and secure sharing of relevant data among businesses, and between businesses and tax administrations. However kneejerk reactions to regulatory mandates by businesses, and lack of tax administrations’ familiarity with modern enterprise systems, are creating the opposite effect. Companies panic-fix local mandates without a sufficient understanding of the impact of their decisions. Neither on their future ability to innovate and standardize. The enterprise resources come first to put systems in place post-haste. They then manage the problems stemming from adopting a patchwork of local tax-driven financial and physical supply chain data integration approaches. This comes from IT budgets that then don’t get spent on proper automation.

Several things can break this vicious circle. Businesses should change their way of addressing these VAT digitization changes as revolutionary rather than evolutionary. By being well informed and well prepared, it is possible to adopt a strategic approach to take advantage of CTC mandates rather than suffer from them. Tax administrations must do their part by adopting existing good practices in designing, implementing, and operating digital platforms for mandatory business data interchange purposes. The ICC CTC Principles are an excellent way to give the world economy that much-needed immunity boost, allowing businesses and governments to improve resilience while freeing up resources locked up in inefficient manual business and tax compliance processes.

Take Action

To find out more about what we believe the future holds, download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls and follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to keep up-to-date with regulatory news and other updates.

Technology can help businesses and governments measure and mitigate the impact of Covid-19. With further waves and recessions biting, technology offers an unparalleled opportunity for governments and business alike to gain a clearer picture of the current panorama. Digital tax returns and real-time or near-real time reporting offer up-to-date financial insight and many tax authorities are pressing ahead with digitisation plans.

Damage assessment and mitigation

The most powerful tool to harness amid economic strife and the most difficult to wield is clarity. Technology can offer this amidst Covid-19.

Technological developments and adoption of digitised processes offer an opportunity to measure tax lost at a macro level. Those nations already implementing continuous transaction controls (CTCs) are at an advantage having insight into lost revenue in the crisis. This year’s events highlighted the benefits of having a panoramic and timely digital view of a nation’s economic health, with economic recovery contingent on access to granular data.

Within Latin America, leading the way in terms of digitising compliance, highly detailed COVID-19 impact analysis reports have been published at key points during the crisis as a result of access to in-line invoice data for all transactions in their economies. The immediacy and quality of this data, and because it covers all or a very large proportion of a country’s economy, is a real game changer.

The trend towards CTCs was set before the pandemic, but the tendency has been catalysed faster than previously thought possible. Though the advantages of CTCs were evident before, with EY predicting that a full economic recovery isn’t achievable until 2024 at the earliest, they offer an unrivalled mechanism for businesses and governments to monitor the situation.

Ongoing health check

The benefits of digitalisation are more significant since ongoing and dynamic assessments are recognised as essential tools to inform government and business decision making. Firms submitting their actual invoice data from business transactions instead of summary returns directly to government platforms (B2G) in real or near-to-real-time, rather than periodically, can instantly view their outgoings; in turn, governments can gauge the macro picture based on overall VAT loss more accurately using digital means.

The advantages of a live dashboard that reveals the evolution of supply and demand are clear. In real-time tracks stock movements, imports/exports and price fluctuations. Having insight into these and many other data points allows a level of analysis into the minutiae of deep subcategories of goods and services offered and sold in an economy and provides clearer visibility for businesses and governments. This kind of data can dispel uncertainty, allowing companies and authorities alike to cut through risks and identify opportunities linked with policy and investment decisions.

Overall, if countries could see the loss in real-time, they can also track changing behaviours and market size, rather than relying on informed guesses without robust data to back up forecasts as currently. After all, to effectively plan for later scenarios, it’s key to understand what’s going on now.

The risk to financial ecosystems

Businesses both small and large are subject to the same rules on evidencing their fiscal activity and financial footprint, and so indirect tax measurement is the crucial indicator of the true damage of these troubling times.

Sophisticated, intricate supply and value chains are all implicated in a complex web, creating intense inter-dependency at all levels. Paramount to successfully surviving in this climate is the ability to monitor developments as they happen. For tax authorities, keeping a close eye on individual digital invoices and other key commercial data allows a forensic and accurate view of how many firms are still afloat. At a wider level, which economies are in serious hot water.

Major VAT discrepancies were already a concern before the crisis and are more so now as consumption tax rate reductions and other fiscal incentives linked with economic inactivity look set to have a devastating impact on both short and medium term revenue collection. Measuring and even reducing the VAT gap will be increasingly important.

Insights through data

Access to data will help unravel the spider’s web of complexities. It provides a better understanding of what the steps both through and out of the recession will be. For business and governments, investing in partnerships that operate across a global landscape will bolster knowledge needed to map out the road to economic recovery. For tax authorities, a clear priority is to understand markets and the impacts on them. This data analysis that keeps pace with developments as they happen is essential.

With whole economies already facing devastating deficit and profit loss from Covid-19, technology must continue to give us the clear vision we need to recover. At a macro level the insights technology can offer are unparalleled. However even on a micro level, individuals can harness data and keep an ongoing record of activity to guide strategic decisions and future investments. With the economic road ahead of many of the world’s economies looking rocky, technology and real-time data offers the potential for a clearer future.

Take Action

To keep up to date with the changing VAT compliance landscape, download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls. Follow us on LinkedIn and Twitter to keep up with regulatory news and other updates.

Find out why it makes sense to invest in tech and automation to streamline tax processes and alleviate the burdens finance teams face.

The shift towards digitisation necessitates a radical adaption and shift in existing tech for industries across the board. As this occurs, tensions and anxieties rise around automation and job losses. With Oxford Economics predicting that 12.5 million manufacturing jobs will be automated in China by 2030, a partially automated workforce is indeed on the horizon.

Human expertise and technology

But human expertise and technology can go hand in hand, with tech supporting teams and boosting productivity tenfold. As a result, for businesses, the only way to thrive in an increasingly digital world is to invest in the right technology.

For organisations operating globally, this is of particular importance as an extensive knowledge of governmental financial legislation in many countries is needed. Financial frameworks are complex to navigate and are constantly changing. Real-time VAT reporting is increasingly prevalent worldwide, with continuous transaction controls (CTCs) tightly constricting many different jurisdictions. Without automation, the hours required to manually keep pace with new rules would far exceed realistic human capacity.

For global companies, manually submitting the paperwork for audits and reports is neither sustainable nor sensible. But an additional problem for those operating in multiple jurisdictions is how to keep pace with ever changing rules and government regulations required for business transactions.

Digital governments

Global governments are reviewing how they measure and collect tax returns. The aim is to improve economic standards in their countries. Digitising return processes gives way for a much more forensic and accurate view of a nation’s economic health. So it’s unsurprising that automated invoicing and reporting has pushed its way to the top of the agenda in recent years.

How the approach is taken to upgrading many transactions and interactions is contingent on specific country viewpoints – certain jurisdictions enforce varying levels of CTCs, real-time invoicing, archiving and reporting of trade documentation. Therefore those operating internationally will feel the additional pressure to accurately track and comply with multiple and complex laws with threatening hefty non-compliance fines. Trading and operating within the law now requires intelligent technology and infrastructure.

Approaches across the globe differ; Latin America pioneered mandatory B2B clearance of e-invoices, and Brazil requires full clearance through a government platform. In Europe, the EU-VAT directive prohibits countries from introducing full e-invoicing – though Italy bucked this trend in 2019, following a lengthy derogation process. As economies shift to a data-driven business model, the move towards a digital tax regime is inevitable.

Machine learning

The VAT gap continues to confound governments across the globe. Therefore to combat it, many nations have created their own systems. In turn, this makes a patchwork of mechanisms unable to communicate with each other. To add to this, the slow adoption of e-invoices in many countries has caused a completely fractured picture – VAT information is still being reported periodically in many countries, with each jurisdiction setting its own standard. We’re a long way from consistency in global digitisation.

As more countries develop their own specific take on digitising invoicing, things look increasingly complex. New regulatory legislation continues to surface and keeping track can cause headaches and accidental noncompliance. Global firms must maintain a keen eye on developments as they happen in all the countries where they operate and its essential they apply systems which can track and update new legislation as it happens.

Flexible APIs

But tech also needs to give an accurate reflection of an entire business’ finances. It needs to link together all the different systems to accurately report tax. This is why flexible APIs are the first order of priority. Programmes with sophisticated APIs enable tax systems to ‘plug in’ to a business and gather vital information. In turn allowing firms to showcase the necessary data, display accurate results and avoid government penalties. It’s essential that technology can integrate with a number of billing systems, ERPs, and procure-to-pay platforms when approaching sensitive government interactions. The volumes of data created and handled are enormous, and increasingly out of the realms of human possibility.

Likewise, tech can assist in formatting information as per the requests of each country, which is essential for digital reporting. Technology exists to monitor and adjust invoice formats. For example, to suit the country a business is operating in and avoid non-compliance penalties. With time usually of the essence and in short supply, tools that automate admin and free up time for strategic elements of business finance pay for themselves in dividends. Effectively, as machines are increasingly ingrained in operations, manual analytics become more challenging. Both governments and businesses are leaning on automation and advanced technology to ease the resulting administrative burdens.

Automate to comply

A truly digital future is in the grasp of many economies, but it comes at a price. To capitalise on the rapid wave of digital transformation, businesses must arm themselves with technology. It’s time to manage the increasing realm of complex and data-driven regulations. It makes sense to invest in tech and automation to handle labour-intensive analysis and research, streamline processes, and alleviate the burdens faced by finance teams. That is without the need for costly expert staff or outsourced support. On the verge of a fully digital way of working, manually submitting the paperwork for audits and reports is no longer practical.

It is important to carefully select technology to synchronise and communicate vital information across a business’ IT infrastructure. In the current recession driven context, the pressure on finance teams is intense. The pressure to perform at their best, safeguard against any financial leaks and strictly monitor expenses and outgoings. In the face of adversity, tech can guide and support us – and could become business critical.

Investing in automation and tech doesn’t have to cost finance jobs. It can instead go hand in hand with human expertise. It can manage arduous and complex tasks. While also freeing up time and energy so businesses can concentrate on what they do best.

Take Action

Find out how Sovos can help you central, standardize and automate your VAT and fiscal reporting obligations.

France is introducing continuous transaction controls (CTC). From 2023, France will implement a mandatory B2B e-invoicing clearance and e-reporting obligation. With these comprehensive requirements, alongside the B2G e-invoicing obligation that is already mandatory, the government aims to increase efficiency, cut costs, and fight fraud. Find out more.

France shows a solid understanding of this complex CTC subject, but some questions remain.

Introduction

France announces VAT changes spurred on by international reforms for continuous controls of VAT transactions (“Continuous Transaction Controls” or “CTCs”). The French government aims to increase efficiency, cut costs and fight fraud through the roll-out of mandatory B2B e-invoice clearance. This coupled with an e-reporting obligation gives the tax administration all relevant data for B2B and B2C transactions. This will start with large companies.

A mixed CTC system

In the report ‘VAT in the Digital Age in France’ ( La TVA à l’ère du digital en France), la Direction General des Finances Publiques – or DG-FIP – describes its aim to implement this mixed solution. Whereby mandatory clearance of e-invoices (ideally for all invoices, without exceptions such as threshold amounts etc) will lay the foundation.

This will provide the tax authority with data relating to any domestic B2B transaction. However, in order to effectively be able to combat fraud, including the carousel type, this is not enough; they need access to all transaction data. Therefore, data that the tax authority will not receive as part of the e-invoice clearance process – notably B2C invoices and invoices issued by foreign suppliers that will not be subject to a domestic French mandate, as well as certain payment data – will be subject to a complementary e-reporting obligation. (The requirement to report this latter data electronically does not mean that the underlying invoices must be e-invoices; parties can still transmit in paper between themselves.)

The Clearance architecture

The report describes how the DG-FIP has considered two potential models for the e-invoice clearance process. This is via the central Chorus Pro portal (currently the clearance point for all B2G invoices). These are the V and the Y model.

In the V model there is one public platform that serves as the clearance point; the central Chorus Pro platform is the only authorized platform via which the invoice can be transmitted to the buyer, or where applicable, the buyer’s service provider.

The Y model includes in addition to the central platform certified third-party service providers, which are authorized to clear and transmit invoices between the transacting parties. This alternative is the preferred option by the service provider community. For that reason – and as this model is more resilient because it is not exposed to a single point of failure – the report appears to favour the Y model.

Timeline

As to the timeline, starting in January 2023, all companies must be able to receive electronic invoices via the centralized system. When it comes to issuance, a similar roll out as for the B2G e-invoice mandate is envisaged, starting with large companies.

Challenges and road ahead

The report lays a good foundation for the deployment of this mixed CTC system. However many issues will need to be clarified to allow for smooth implementation. Some of which quite fundamental.

      • The proposed model means that the French tax administration needs to think through the details of service provider certification.
      • The relationship between the proposed high-level CTC scheme with pre-existing rules around e-invoicing integrity and authenticity. The French version of SAF-T (FEC) and digital VAT reporting options need to be clarified. On that last topic, the French budget law for 2020 that initiated this move towards CTCs suggested that prefilled VAT returns are among the key objectives, even if this does not feature prominently in the DG-FIP report.
      • Some questions remain about the central archiving facility associated with the CTC scheme.
      • The proposed central e-invoicing address directory requires careful design (including maintenance) and implementation.

The report proposes a progressive and pedagogical deployment. This will ensure that businesses will manage this -for some radical – shift to electronic invoicing and reporting. The ICC’s practice principles on CTC are referenced, specifically noting the importance of early notice and ICC’s advice to give businesses at least 12-18 months to prepare. The first deadline comes up in just over two years’ time. It leaves only 6-12 months for the French tax administration to work out all details and get the relevant laws, decrees and guidelines adopted. This is if business should have what ICC believes is a reasonable time to adapt.

myDATA updates

On 22 June, the joint Ministerial Decision that sets forth the myDATA framework was published. The decision specifies, among other things, the scope of application and applicable exemptions, the data to be transmitted, transmission methods and procedures, applicable deadlines and how transactions should be characterized.

Starting from January 2021, the required data must be reported to the myDATA platform in real-time. For information relevant to the year 2020, taxpayers have been awarded more breathing room: until the end of this year, the required data can be reported within 5 days after the issuance of an invoice, but not later than the 20th of the following month.

The implementation of myDATA will be performed in a phased manner, with ERP-based reporting of outbound and inbound data with their respective classifications starting from 1 October 2020. If a myDATA accredited e-invoicing service provider (according to the rules of the new framework) is used for e-invoicing, the reporting to myDATA through a service provider is possible from 20 July 2020.

A closer look at e-invoicing developments

To encourage businesses to adopt e-invoicing, the Ministry of Finance, through a draft bill published on 19 June, provided a number of incentives for businesses to use e-invoicing facilitated through service providers until the end of 2022.

The incentives provided are:

Based on these recent developments, it is clear that the Greek government wishes to promote the adoption of e-invoicing in Greece but does not yet go so far as to make it mandatory. A decision specifying the details of the e-invoicing scheme is expected to be published by the IAPR in the very near future.

For companies operating in Turkey, 2019 was an eventful year for tax regulatory change and in particular, e-invoicing reform. Since it was first introduced in 2012, the e-invoicing mandate has grown, and companies are having to adapt in order to comply with requirements in 2020 and beyond. Turkey’s digital transformation and e-invoicing landscape continues to evolve.

According to the General Communique on the Tax Procedure Law (General Communique), more taxpayers now need to comply with the mandatory e-invoicing framework. The General Communique published on 19 October 2019 covers other e-documents such as e-arşiv, e-delivery note, e-self-employment receipts, e-producer receipts, e-tickets, e-note of expenses, e-Insurance Commission Expense Documents, e-Insurance Policies, eDocument of Currency Exchange, and e-Bank Receipts.

The scope of e-invoicing

From 1 July 2020, taxpayers with a gross sales revenue of TL 5 million or above in fiscal years 2018 or 2019 must switch to the e-invoice system. Taxpayers who meet these requirements in 2020 or later, should switch to the e-invoice system at the beginning of the seventh month of the following accounting year.

Mandatory e-invoicing is not only based on the threshold

Turkey’s tax authority has set some sector-based parameters for businesses operating in Turkey. Companies licensed by the Turkish Energy Market Regulatory Authority, middlemen or fruits or vegetable traders, online service providers facilitating online trade, importers and dealers are some of the taxpayers also required to switch to e-invoices, irrespective of their turnover.

The scope of E-Arşiv invoice

E-arsiv fatura documents B2C transactions. But also in case the transacting counterparty is not registered with the TRA for e-invoicing. Similar to e-invoice, the e-arşiv invoice, became mandatory for intermediary service providers; online advertisers; and intermediary online advertisers who switched to the system from 1 January 2020.

Taxpayers not in scope for e-invoice and e-arşiv must issue e-arşiv invoices through the Turkish Revenue Administration´s portal. That is if the total amount of an invoice issued, including taxes, exceeds:

Turkey’s Government continues to tackle its VAT gap through digital transformation. By taking greater control of reporting and requiring more granular tax detail.  So, businesses operating in Turkey need powerful e-invoicing strategies to comply with the growing demands for digital tax transformation.

Take Action

Sovos has more than a decade of experience keeping clients up to date with e-invoicing mandates all over the world.

With two weeks to go until the first mandatory phase of the Indian e-invoicing reform go live, the GST Council slammed the breaks. Or at least, bring it to a significant temporary standstill of 6 months. As a result, the India e-invoicing reform is now postponed until 1 October 2020

Following a long list of complaints — both from the private sector toward the GST Council, as well as from the GST Council vis-á-vis the IT infrastructure provider that powers the GST Network, Infosys — the council decided to revisit the 1 April go-live in a recent meeting held today, Saturday 14 March.

GST Council Decisions

The GST council made a number of important decisions, including most notably:

The decisions made in the 39th meeting of the GST Council will require either that the legislative framework (Notifications) published in early December be amended or entirely replaced with new ones to reflect the new reality. However, it wouldn’t be unreasonable to expect even further delays to the roll out of this reform. This given to the recent economic volatility triggered by the ongoing pandemic. Only once both global markets as well as the underlying technical platforms of the GST control reform seem to stabilize will the post-October timeline of the roll out be fully certain.