,

What is Japan’s Qualified Invoice System?

Coskun Antal
July 13, 2021

Japan is in the middle of a multi-year process of updating its consumption tax system. This started with the introduction of its multiple tax rate system on 1 October 2019 and the next step is expected to be the implementation of the so-called Qualified Invoice System as a tax control measure on 1 October 2023.

Through this significant change, the Japanese government is attempting to solve a tax leakage problem that has existed for many years.

The cascade effect of multiple tax rates

The Japanese indirect tax is referred to as Japanese Consumption Tax (JCT) and is levied on the supply of goods and services in Japan. The consumption tax rate increased from 8% to 10% on 1 October 2019. At the same time, Japan introduced multiple rates, with a reduced tax rate of 8% applied to certain transactions.

Currently, Japan doesn’t follow the common practice of including the applicable tax rate in the invoice to calculate consumption tax. Instead, the current system (called the ledger system) is based on transaction evidence and the company’s accounting books. The government believes this system causes systemic problems related to tax leakage.

A new system – the Qualified Invoice System – will be introduced from 1 October 2023 to counter this. The key difference when compared to an invoice issued today is that a qualified invoice must include a breakdown of applicable tax rates for that given transaction.

Under the new system, only registered JCT payers can issue qualified tax invoices, and on the buyer side of the transaction, taxpayers will only be eligible for input tax credit where a qualified invoice has been issued. In other words, the Qualified Invoice System will require both parties to adapt their invoicing templates and processes to specify new information as well as the need to register with the relevant tax authorities.

Preparing for the Qualified Invoice System

A transitional period for the implementation of the new e-invoicing system applies from 1 October 1 2019 until 1 October 2023.

In order to issue qualified invoices, JCT taxpayers must register with Japan’s National Tax Agency (“NTA”). It will be possible to apply for registration from 1 October 1 2021 at the earliest, and this application must be filed no later than 31 March 2023, which is six months in advance of the implementation date of the e-invoicing system. Non-registered taxpayers will not be able to issue qualified invoices.

The registered JCT payers may issue electronic invoices instead of paper-based invoices provided that certain conditions are met.

What’s next?

The introduction of the Qualified Invoice System will affect both Japanese and foreign companies that engage in JCT taxable transactions in Japan. To ensure proper tax calculations and input tax credit, taxpayers must make sure they understand the requirements, and update or adjust their accounting and bookkeeping systems to comply with the new requirements in advance of the implementation of the Qualified Invoice System in 2023.

Take Action

Get in touch with our experts who can help you prepare for the Japanese Qualified Invoice System.

Download VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls to find out more about the future of tax systems around the world.

Sign up for Email Updates

Stay up to date with the latest tax and compliance updates that may impact your business.

Author

Coskun Antal

Coşkun is Regulatory Specialist at Sovos, based in Istanbul. Coşkun monitors and interprets both the regulations and associated technical specifications issued by tax authorities. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Istanbul Technical University.
Share This Post

EMEA IPT
November 23, 2022
Fire Brigade Tax in Slovenia

Problems encountered with Fire Brigade Tax rate increase in Slovenia Slovenia’s Fire Brigade Tax (FBT) has changed. The rate increased from 5% to 9%. This came into effect on 1 October 2022. The first submission deadline followed on 15 November 2022. Unfortunately, the transition has been plagued by problems. We discuss some issues and how […]

E-Invoicing Compliance EMEA
November 22, 2022
E-invoicing and Fiscal Digitization in Africa

African countries are following e-invoicing and continuous transaction control trends implemented rapidly by many countries around the globe. Each country in the continent is developing their variation of a tax digitization system. This means there is currently no standardisation with compliance requirements differing in each jurisdiction. A common transaction reporting feature among African countries is […]

EMEA VAT & Fiscal Reporting
November 22, 2022
Expert Series Part IV: New Roles for IT in the Wake of Expanding Global Mandates

Part IV of V – Ryan Ostilly, vice president of product and GTM strategy EMEA & APAC, Sovos Click here to read part III of the series.   Government-mandated e-invoicing laws are making their way across nearly every region of the globe, bringing more stringent mandates and expectations on businesses. Inserted into every aspect of your […]

E-Invoicing Compliance EMEA
November 16, 2022
Denmark E-Invoicing Requirements

New bookkeeping law – Lov om bogføring On 19 May 2022, the Danish Parliament passed a new bookkeeping law – Lov om bogføring – introducing requirements for companies to use a digital bookkeeping system. Section 16 of the Law requires many Danish companies to use a digital bookkeeping system and make their bookings electronically. The final […]

EMEA VAT & Fiscal Reporting
November 15, 2022
UK: Updates to Making Tax Digital for VAT

Update: 3 November 2022 by Russell Hughes Making Tax Digital – Filing VAT Returns through Online VAT Account to become redundant From Tuesday 1 November 2022, businesses filing VAT returns in the UK will no longer be able to submit via an existing online VAT account unless HMRC has agreed to an exemption from Making […]