E-invoicing was introduced in Peru in 2010, following the continuous transaction controls (CTC) trend in Latin American countries for a more efficient collection of consumption taxes. Since then, the government has rolled out measures to encompass a significant number of taxpayers under the country’s mandatory e-invoicing regime and advance new technical and institutional structures within its System of Electronic Emissions (SEE – Sistema de Emisión Electrónica).

June 2022 marked the final deadline for including the last group of taxpayers in the country’s e-invoicing mandate. However, the government continues to expand its system, with the latest update proposed by a draft resolution introducing important changes to the Peruvian e-transport document, the Guía de Remisión electronica – GRE.

Changes in the E-transport Document

The Peruvian tax authority (SUNAT) published on 2 June 2022 a draft resolution introducing changes to the GRE, the electronic transport document that must be issued in connection to invoices (comprobantes de pagos) for the control of goods under transportation. The GRE is only vital while the goods are in transit but is a document commonly kept by companies to maintain internal controls of transported goods.

The new draft resolution aims to regulate the issuance of the e-transport document further, introducing several changes, mainly to optimise the control of goods and eliminate the use of paper.

Among the many changes introduced by the draft, the main are:

What this means for taxpayers

Taxpayers must be ready to issue GREs remitente and transportista exclusively through their own systems using a software provider (PSE – proveedores de servicios electrónicos) or the SUNAT Portal. This requirement may represent quite the impact on taxpayers that regularly issue a large volume of GREs through the electronic services operator’s channel, the SEE-OSE (Operador de Servicios Electrónicos).

The most impactful change, however, is that taxpayers will only be able to use the GRE as a support document for the transport of goods. Under current legislation, besides the GRE, the factura guía and the liquidacion de compras, which are regular invoices with additional transport information, can also be used to support transporting goods. Issuance of the factura guía is a common practice since it entails the generation of one single document that serves both the sales transaction and transportation. However, the draft resolution only allows the use of the GRE for this purpose.

The introduction of the QR code is the government’s approach to a modern and efficient control method. The bidimensional code is generated by SUNAT once the CDR (constancia de recepción) acquires accepted status and may be presented in either digital or printed format.

Although taxpayers may still support transportation by providing their registration number (RUC), the series and the GRE number, it is expected that the QR code will become the principal method to support transit, and the RUC will only be used as a contingency method.

A new type of e-transport document has also been introduced. The guía de remisión por evento may only be issued through the SUNAT Portal and is used to complement a previously issued GRE in the case of unforeseeable events not attributable to the issuer. In these cases, current regulation supports the transfer with the same document. The draft resolution, however, requires that the GRE por evento is issued before restarting the transportation of goods.

Another change that taxpayers must be aware of, as it might give rise to complex scenarios, is the creation of a new catalogue of measure units applicable only to GREs, found in Annex III. The already existent measure unit catalogues for all other invoices will not apply to the GRE, which is bound to cause a lack of uniformity since the same concept would use two different catalogues.

Rollout Dates

The draft resolution sets 13 July 2022 as its date of entry into force when taxpayers already in the scope of the GRE may start to issue through the appropriate channels and voluntarily start using the QR code as the support for transportation.

However, until 30 September 2022, taxpayers may exceptionally issue GREs remitente through the SEE-OSE, considering the conditions and requirements in place before the publication of the resolution. The draft also establishes a list of certain taxpayers (issuers and transporters) who will become obliged to issue the GRE and the corresponding dates, in Annex X, according to taxpayer types and the goods in transport, starting 1 January 2023.

What’s next?

As this is a draft resolution, the changes only become definite with the official publication of the final version of the resolution. However, as 13 July 2022 approaches, the resolution is expected to be published in the following weeks. Therefore, taxpayers who are already under the obligation to issue GREs must be ready to comply with the new mandates within a month.

SUNAT accepts comments to the draft resolution, which can be sent via email until 16 June 2022, to the following address: RPATRICI@sunat.gob.pe.

Take Action

Speak to our team if you have any questions about the latest e-invoicing requirements in Peru. Sovos has more than a decade of experience keeping clients up to date with e-invoicing mandates all over the world

The Colombian electronic invoicing system is reaching maturity level. Since its inception in 2018, Colombia has been steadily consolidating and expanding the mandate to make it more stable, reliable and comprehensive.

As a result of the enactment of the recent Resolution 000013/2021, the Colombian tax administration (DIAN), officially expanded the electronic invoicing mandate to also include payroll transactions. This expansion follows the pattern established by Mexico, Brazil and other countries that already expanded the electronic invoicing mandate to payroll transactions as well.

The Support Document for Electronic Payroll is known locally in Colombia as Documento Soporte de Nomina Electronica or also simply as Nomina Electronica. It is a new digital document intended to support and validate the payroll related costs and deductions of income tax and the VAT credits (if applicable) when businesses make payments resulting from labor, legal, and other similar types of relations (pensions).

In simple terms, labour cost transactions should be reported under this new digital system for them to be valid. This is whenever employers make payments for wages, salaries, reimbursements, pensions etc.

Who is required to comply with the electronic payroll mandate?

Employers paying wages under a labor relation, where payments are reported as expenses for income tax purposes or as deductible taxes for VAT, need to comply. However, there are important exceptions derived from that legal framework. For instance, public offices, non-for-profit entities or taxpayers under the simplified regime are not currently required to comply. Consequently, they do not need to use such payments for deductions of income tax or VAT.

Schedule of deployment

The DIAN established an implementation schedule based on the number of employees the taxpayer has in the payroll. There are four stages or groups subject to the following deadlines:

Group Deadline to start the generation and remittance of the document Number of employees
From Up to
1 1 September 2021 More than 250 employees101
2 1 October 2021 101 250
3 1 November 2021 11 100
4 1 December 2021 1 10

Deadline for remittance

As the Nomina Electronica is required to be reported monthly, the payments for each month should be reported by the 10th day of the next month as a result. The adjustment notes should be reported within the same deadline, once they have been made by the employer.

Reporting elements of the electronic payroll mandate

There are two basic types of reports that are parts of this mandate: the Support Document of the electronic payroll, and – when necessary – the Adjustment Note.

Support Document of Electronic Payroll or Nomina Electronica

This electronic document contains the information supporting the payments made to employees as wages and other compensations, deductions and the difference between them made by the employer, as reported in the payroll. The employer must then generate and transmit the document to the DIAN using the XML format established in the technical documentation included in the regulation 000037/2021.

Adjustment Notes

In this mandate there are no credit notes as we know them in the electronic invoice system of Colombia. However, when an employer needs to make corrections to the Support Document of Electronic Payroll reported to the DIAN, it can issue what we know as Adjustment Notes (or Notas de Ajuste) where the employer will be allowed to correct any value previously reported to the DIAN via the Nomina Electronica.

Content and structure of the reports

Employers must submit reports to the DIAN individualised for each beneficiary receiving payments from the employers. As a result, the report requires the provision of some mandatory information for the DIAN to validate. This includes the proper identification of the report itself, the reporting party, in addition to the employees, wages or other payments employees, date, numbering, software etc.

Another mandatory information element that is worth mentioning is the CUNE or Unique Code of Electronic Payroll Support Document. This is a unique identifier for each Electronic Payroll Support Document. It will allow exact identification of each report or the Adjustment Notes issued after it. However, there is some additional optional information that can be provided depending on the needs or convenience of the employer making the report.

From a technical perspective, neither the Support Document of the Electronic Payroll nor the Adjustment Notes are based on the UBL 2.1 structure used in Colombia for the electronic invoice. This is because the UBL standard does not include modules for payroll transactions or reports. Therefore, the DIAN has based its architecture in a different XML standard. Each report requires a digital signature. For that, the taxpayer can use the same digital certificate used for signing electronic invoices.

Generation, transmission and validation

The current regulations do not require that the Nomina Electronica or the Adjustment Notes should be generated by a particular software solution or by a software provider authorized by the DIAN. Taxpayers have the option to generate the report using their own solution. That is a market solution or a solution that the DIAN will provide for small taxpayers. However, all reports should strictly follow the technical documentation issued by the DIAN within the Resolution 000037/2021. The remittance of those documents is electronic, using the webservices specified by the DIAN.

After making the transmission, the DIAN then validates the document. They will then report back the corresponding application response to the taxpayer, indicating its acceptance and validation. Only then, will the amounts reported in the payroll document are valid expenses for the deduction.

Penalties and sanctions

Non-compliance with electronic payroll in Colombia will be subject to the same fines and penalties established for not complying with the electronic invoicing mandate, as defined in Art. 652-1 of the Tax Code of Colombia (Estatuto Tributario). But the most important implication of non-compliance is that any payment not reported by the employer, will not be allowed as expenses for income tax or VAT purposes when applicable.

Take Action

Speak to our experts about your tax requirements in Colombia and keep up to date with the changing VAT compliance landscape by downloading VAT Trends: Toward Continuous Transaction Controls.

Companies dealing with complex sales and use tax determination, VAT regulations and other tax challenges across the globe know that SAP alone is not equipped to support the varying requirements from country to country. As SAP sunsets support and updates for ECC and R3, companies must move to HANA to keep their systems up to date. With this inevitable change to S/4HANA or HANA Enterprise Cloud, now is the perfect time to step back and develop a comprehensive strategy to managing tax worldwide.

SAP users must migrate to HANA by 2025, but a majority have not yet started the process. Since the move requires major changes to ERP infrastructure, SAP users with global operations should take advantage of the unique opportunity to be more strategic in their implementation. With the right approach, companies can future-proof their solutions in a way that ensures they can keep pace with constant changes in tax regulations throughout Latin America, Europe and beyond.

Learn how to minimise business disruption during an SAP S/4HANA upgrade project in the wake of modern tax: Read Preparing SAP S/4HANA for Continuous Tax Compliance and don’t let the requirements of modern tax derail your company.

Governments around the world are implementing technology for tax enforcement. In order to keep up, companies must make the digitisation of tax a core pillar of their HANA migrations.

In the move to HANA, companies must consider the new world of tax, which includes:

The move to S/4HANA or HANA Enterprise Cloud requires companies to move all of their processes, customisations and third-party add-ons to the new platform. As such, there are several critical considerations.

What to migrate, and when

Since most companies’ SAP ERP systems have been built and customised over many years, many will benefit from a phased approach to HANA implementation. The less customised modules, such as Financial Accounting (FI) and Controlling (CO) will be easier to move than Materials Management (MM) or Sales and Distribution (SD), which will need a long-term plan for customisations.

What to do with customisations and third-party apps

Many SAP configurations have become a patchwork of customised code and bolt-on applications. This is especially true when it comes to sales and use tax determination, e-invoicing, and VAT compliance and reporting, since requirements are vastly different in every jurisdiction a company operates. The move to HANA gives companies the opportunity to consolidate, eliminating local configurations in favour of a global strategy. Companies that proactively plan can help to ensure that the next 15 years are simplified, without the constantly changing configurations needed in the previous 15 years as governments have gone digital.

Take Action

With an upcoming migration to SAP HANA, businesses must consider a solution that maintains SAP as the central source of the truth while keeping pace with constant regulatory change. Learn how Sovos is helping companies do just that, safeguarding the value of their HANA implementation here.

On May 2, 2017, we held a webinar titled “Mexico SAT Lessons Learned from Complemento de Pagos” and we would like to share with you some of our most frequently asked questions around Mexico’s upcoming mandate. 

The Complemento de Pagos requirement is newly mandated by the tax authorities in Mexico requiring companies to generate a payment receipt (a complemento de pago) every time they receive partial payments from a client. This will help Mexico’s tax authority better track payments and tax liability.

Q: How long does it take to issue the payment receipt once the payment of an invoice has been received?
A: Once data is available, the receipt can be generated based on business processes whether it is a batch or manual function.

Q: For SAP, do you use the IDOC solution?
A: Yes, data is extracted out of SAP via IDOC, then sent to the REAL-TIME connector to process the data.

Q: What is the go live date for Complemento de Pagos?
A: Starting December 1st, 2017, all taxpayers will be required to comply with CFDI version 3.3 and the Complemento de Pagos. The process is optional for businesses beginning July 1, 2017.

Q: How does the cancellation of the payment receipt work?
A: Under the new regulation, the taxpayer cannot cancel any ingreso CFDIs when there are payments (pagos) associated with the original CFDI. However, you can cancel a payment receipt but it must be replaced with a new one.

Learn more: https://www.sat.gob.mx/consultas/92764/comprobante-de-recepcion-de-pagos 

Q: In case the business allows a discount for the payment, how would it be recognised by the government? The invoice is $1,000 but I received $900 where the business allowed a $100 discount.
A: You will be required to generate a credit note to record the discount provided to the customer referencing the original document. Then, create a receipt note to register the $900.

Q: Is this needed only for partial payments or for all payments, even if the payment is in full?
A: The only scenario when you don’t need the Complemento de Pago is when you receive full payment at the same time of generating the CFDI. 

Learn more: https://www.sat.gob.mx/consultas/92764/comprobante-de-recepcion-de-pagos 

Q: What is the timeframe to implement your solution?
A: Generally, depending on business scenarios, it can take about 8-10 weeks. 

Q: We are using our own CFDI solution, would it be possible to only buy the "Complemento de Pagos” solution from Sovos?
A: Yes, as long as the CFDI data exist for matching purposes within SAP.

Q: Do I have to generate two Complemento de Pagos referencing the same invoice (perhaps in two different periods)?
A: Yes, you will need to reference the original CFDI in all the Complemento de Pagos generated.

Q: In SAP, how do you trigger the Complemento de Pagos message?
A: Our process is based on a clearing document. Accessing our Tcode, you will see all the documents ready to be posted, manually or batch.

Q: Do you have to provide a copy of the payment receipt to your customer?
A: Yes, you will have to provide the government output to the customer.

Q: When payments are for an amount greater or less than the value of the CFDI how do you make the adjustment? It is common for our foreign customers to automatically apply charges for difference in price, quality, or missing information.
A: You must adjust via a credit or debit note based upon the correct amount.

Q: What is Metodo de Pago?
A: This is the way in which the operation was carried out, meaning in “one exhibition” or “partially”.

Q: What is Forma de Pago?
A: This is the way in which the payment was made for the operations – cash, check, credit card, electronic transfer, etc.

Q: How does the Complemento de Pagos work for partial payments?
A: You would issue a CFDI for the total value of the operation at the time it is performed, and metodo de pago should be PEP (pago inicial y parcialidades) or PPD (pago en parcialidades o diferido).
Subsequently, you can issue a CFDI for each of the payments that are received, in which it should be noted:

  1. “Zero” in the field “Total” without any data in the fields “MetodoPago” and “FormaPago”
  2. Incorporate the “Complemento de pago”

The amount of the payment shall be applied proportionally to the items included in the voucher issued for the total value of the operation.

Sovos offers the only end-to-end, SAP-native solution for CFDI v3.3 and Complemento de Pagos which allows companies to maintain a centralised source of truth in SAP.

Contact us today to learn how we can help you reduce the risks associated with these new requirements in Mexico, while maintaining SAP as the core system of record.

Overview

The main indirect tax of Mexico is the Value Added Tax (locally known as IVA), which generally applies to all imports, supplies of goods, and the provision of services by a taxable person unless specifically exempted by a particular law. The tax is imposed by the federal government of Mexico and ordinarily applies on each level of the commercialisation chain. This tax has been applied in Mexico since 1980.

Click here to read "Why the New Process for Cancelling E-Invoices in Mexico Matters"

Tax Rate

Mexico applies a single standard rate of 16% across the country. However, there is also a 0% rate applicable to exports and the local supply of certain goods and services. Sales of ice, fresh water, machinery and raw materials for manufacturers, books, newspapers, magazines by their editors, medicines, as well as the supply of services to eligible manufacturers, are subject to the 0% rate.

It is worth mentioning that until December 2013, Mexico applied a reduced rate of 11% in Mexican Border states of Baja California Norte, Baja California Sur, Quintana Roo, the municipalities of Caborca and Cananea, and in the bordering regions of the Colorado River in the state of Sonora. This was an effort largely to attract businesses to these areas and because the sales tax in the U.S. border states was half of the IVA in Mexico. These regions were commonly referred as the “maquiladora zones.”

That 11% reduced rate was revoked starting January 1, 2014, and substituted with a broader regime of incentives aimed at the manufacturing companies located in that region.

Taxable Base and Exemptions

As mentioned before, the Mexican IVA applies to all goods and services unless specifically exempted by the law. There is a wide variety of goods and services exempt from the tax, including:

Credit-Debit Mechanism

The Mexican IVA doesn’t differ much from IVA in other countries in that it allows the taxpayer to deduct the IVA that has been paid to the taxpayer’s suppliers or IVA that the taxpayer has paid himself at the time of importing goods that were subject to the tax. In addition to the IVA paid on imports and local purchases, the taxpayer also has the right to credit the IVA withheld by clients that are required to apply the reverse charge system that we are going to examine later.

In those instances where the taxpayer cannot use all the credit that has been accumulated on its purchases, the remaining amount can be carried over to later periods or eventually even to request a reimbursement from the government.

Taxable Event and Periodic Payment

One of the unique characteristics of the Mexican IVA is that when determining the taxable event, the law requires the taxpayer to use the cash accounting method rather than the accrual accounting method. What this basically means is that IVA on a sale is considered due when the seller is effectively paid, rather than when the invoice has been issued, the service provided or the good has been supplied. If the seller does not get paid, no tax liability exists either.

In general, the Mexican IVA should be paid on a monthly basis, no later than the 17th day of the month after the taxable event occurred.

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Take Action

Learn how other mandates in Latin America affect your business and how you can overcome challenges by downloading the Definitive Guide to Latin American Compliance.

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CFDI, which stands for Comprobantes Fiscal Digital por Internet, is the electronic billing schema defined by the Mexican federal tax code. It has been mandated for companies doing business in Mexico since 2011. The goal of CFDI is added visibility into companies’ tax liabilities, so that the government can ensure it is receiving accurate payments, and it has paid off. Audits based on the legislation resulted in a 34% increase in VAT collected in a single quarter.

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