Origin of Goods – Claiming Relief on Trade Between the EU and UK

Andy Spencer
February 10, 2022

The EU-UK Trade and Cooperation Agreement (TCA) provides for tariff-free trade between the United Kingdom (UK) and the European Union (EU) but does not work in the same way as when the UK was part of the EU.

Before Brexit, if the goods were in free circulation within the EU, they could be moved cross-border without incurring any additional customs duty. Therefore, the origin of the goods was not relevant for this intra-EU movement. If the goods originated from outside the EU, customs duty would have been paid as required when they first entered into free circulation but was not payable again.

This difference creates issues for UK businesses where they import finished goods into the UK first before being sold to the EU. As the goods are not being processed in the UK, they cannot be of UK origin and will be subject to double duty unless specific duty mitigations measures are taken.

The same tariff-free trade between the EU and the UK can be achieved under the TCA, but it depends on meeting the detailed rules within the agreement. The key is in the origin of the goods and whether they qualify under the terms of the TCA. This ensures that only eligible goods are tariff-free and removes the risk of goods entering from outside the Free Trade Area without paying customs duty.

The requirement for goods to be of relevant origin to benefit from zero tariffs on imports under the TCA has been in place since 1 January 2021.

Claiming and evidencing relief

If goods meet the appropriate rules of origin, preference can be claimed on the customs declaration when they are imported. Thus, the claim is made by the importer of the goods. However, it is not as simple as completing the appropriate box on the declaration; there is a requirement for the proper evidence to be held.

To claim tariff preference, the importer needs to have one of the following proofs of origin:

  • A statement on origin – this must be made out by the exporter to confirm the product originates in the UK or EU; or
  • Importer’s knowledge – this option allows the importer to claim tariff preference based on their knowledge of where the goods they’re importing originate.

If they are relying on a statement of origin, the exporter will have to prove that the goods are of appropriate origin to qualify.

End of easement

In 2021, there was a light touch approach towards holding evidence when the customs declaration was made. The TCA allowed for a declaration to be made and the evidence to be obtained later to reduce the burden on business.  There is still a requirement to provide the appropriate evidence on request, so businesses must ensure that it will be available if necessary.

There may be checks that the goods are of appropriate origin to be free of duty under the TCA.  With effect from 1 January 2022, there is a need to have the appropriate evidence that the goods meet the origin requirements when the declaration is lodged. Therefore, businesses will need to ensure that the appropriate documents are immediately available should they be requested.

Post import claims for relief

Businesses should note that it is not obligatory to claim preference at the time of entry of the goods as claims can be made up to three years later, as long as there is valid proof of origin. It is beneficial to claim preference at the earliest possible time to benefit cash flow and provide certainty of the cost of the goods.

Therefore, businesses will need to ensure that they determine origin of goods correctly and have the appropriate evidence to support the goods being tariff-free.

It’s important to remember that the rules for trade between Northern Ireland and the EU are different because of the Northern Ireland Protocol.

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Author

Andy Spencer

Andy is a highly experienced indirect tax professional who has worked in VAT for over twenty five years. Andy joined Sovos in 2009 and has responsibility for the consulting and compliance teams. Within the consulting team, he is involved in delivering major international VAT projects for blue-chip clients, bringing expertise in both structural compliance and commercial efficiency. Andy specialises in providing clients with bespoke VAT reviews that help them develop into new territories with the appropriate controls in place to manage VAT effectively. Andy has developed expertise in international VAT throughout his career and has advised on a broad range of issues in many countries. Within the compliance team, Andy is responsible for the integrity and professionalism of Sovos’ compliance offering working with the team to ensure clients meet their compliance obligations around the EU and beyond. Andy began his career with HM Customs & Excise and before joining Sovos was VAT Director at Baker Tilly’s Southern UK operation, a Senior VAT Manager at KPMG for six years, and a Senior VAT Manager at Ernst & Young for seven.
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