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Streamlining VAT Reporting with OSS

Andy Spencer
April 14, 2022

E-commerce continues to grow, and tax authorities globally have struggled to keep pace. Tax authorities developed many VAT systems before the advent of e-commerce in its current format and the evolution of the internet. Around the world this has resulted in changes to ensure that taxation occurs in the way that the government wants, removing distortions of competition between local and non-resident businesses.

The European Commission made changes on 1 July 2021 with the E-commerce VAT Package, which modernised how VAT applies to e-commerce sales and also how the VAT is collected. As the previous system had been in place since 1 July 1993, change was well overdue.

Taxation at Place of Consumption

The principle of the taxation of e-commerce in the European Union (EU) is that it should occur in the place of consumption – this normally means where the final consumer makes use of the goods and services. For goods, this means where the goods are delivered to and for services, where the consumer is resident – although there are some exceptions.

Where the VAT is due in a different Member State than where the supplier is established, this requires the supplier to account for VAT in a different country. Micro-businesses are relieved of the requirement to account for VAT in the place of consumption. Though, most e-commerce businesses selling across the EU will have to account for VAT in many other Member States which would be administratively burdensome.

Expansion of the One Stop Shop (OSS)

To overcome this problem, the European Commission decided to significantly expand the Mini One Stop Shop (MOSS), which was previously in place for B2C supplies of telecoms, broadcasting and electronically supplied services. Three new schemes allow businesses to register for VAT in a single Member State and use that OSS registration to account for VAT in all other Member States where VAT is due.

Union OSS allows both EU and non-EU businesses to account for VAT on intra-EU distance sales of goods. It also allows EU businesses to account for VAT on intra-EU supplies of B2C services.

Non-Union OSS allows non-EU businesses to account for VAT on all supplies of B2C services where EU VAT is due.

Import OSS allows both EU and non-EU businesses to account for VAT on imports of goods in packages with an intrinsic value of less than €150.

Currently, none of the OSS schemes are compulsory, and businesses can choose to be registered for VAT in the Member State where the VAT is due. The European Commission is currently consulting on the success of the OSS schemes, and one of the proposals is that the use of Import OSS would become compulsory. There are also questions about whether the threshold should be increased, although that would require consideration of how to deal with customs duty as the €150 threshold is the point at which customs duty can become chargeable.

Benefits of OSS

The use of the Union and non-Union OSS schemes can provide a valuable alternative to registering for VAT in multiple Member States. However, there can be other reasons why a business will need to maintain VAT registrations in other countries. Businesses should carry out a full supply chain review to identify the VAT obligations.

There are also many benefits to using the Import OSS, including the ability to recover VAT on returned goods and a simplified delivery process for both the supplier and customer.

Any businesses using any OSS schemes should fully understand the scheme’s requirements.  Non-compliance can result in exclusion with the requirement to register for VAT in those countries where it is due. This will remove the benefit of the OSS schemes, increasing costs and administrative burden for the business.

Take Action

Get in touch with our team to find out how we can help your business understand the new OSS requirements.

Want to know more about the EU E-Commerce VAT Package and One Stop Shop and how it can impact your business? Download our e-book.

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Author

Andy Spencer

Andy is a highly experienced indirect tax professional who has worked in VAT for over twenty five years. Andy joined Sovos in 2009 and has responsibility for the consulting and compliance teams. Within the consulting team, he is involved in delivering major international VAT projects for blue-chip clients, bringing expertise in both structural compliance and commercial efficiency. Andy specialises in providing clients with bespoke VAT reviews that help them develop into new territories with the appropriate controls in place to manage VAT effectively. Andy has developed expertise in international VAT throughout his career and has advised on a broad range of issues in many countries. Within the compliance team, Andy is responsible for the integrity and professionalism of Sovos’ compliance offering working with the team to ensure clients meet their compliance obligations around the EU and beyond. Andy began his career with HM Customs & Excise and before joining Sovos was VAT Director at Baker Tilly’s Southern UK operation, a Senior VAT Manager at KPMG for six years, and a Senior VAT Manager at Ernst & Young for seven.
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