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SIRE: New Peruvian Electronic Record Keeping Mandate

Kelly Muniz
July 4, 2022

On 1 January every year, taxpayers operating in Peru must assess their monthly income over a certain period determined by law to verify if they fall under the obligation to keep electronic ledgers. Taxpayers above the established threshold or who wish to voluntarily keep their ledgers electronically may do so by using the Electronic Ledgers Program (Programa de Libros Electrónicos – PLE), which covers all electronic books, or through the System of Electronic Ledgers (Sistema de Libros Electrónicos Portal – SLE), exclusively for the records of sales and purchases.

Earlier this year, however, the Peruvian tax authority (SUNAT) approved a new system specifically for the records of sales and purchases, the Integrated System of Electronic Records (Sistema Integrado de Registros Electrónicos – SIRE). Through the new Resolution 40-2022/SUNAT, the Electronic Record of Purchases (Registro de Compras Electrónico – RCE) was introduced, a module similar to the Electronic Record of Sales and Earnings (Registro de Ventas e Ingresos Eletrónicos – RVIE) created in 2021 and already in use by taxpayers.

The two modules, RVIE and RCE, compose the SIRE. This new system will be rolled out gradually, starting in October 2022, obliging taxpayers to migrate from the PLE and SLE to generate their records of sales and purchases exclusively through SIRE while maintaining the PLE for other ledgers.

How the SIRE works

The primary purpose of the SIRE is to simplify the generation of records of sales and purchases for taxpayers. Through the SIRE, a proposal for the RVIE and the RCE is automatically generated. It is available from the 2nd calendar day of every month. The taxpayer may accept, modify or replace it with the information they wish to present to SUNAT. If there are no transactions during the monthly period, the taxpayer must still submit a blank file to SUNAT.

Under the current systems (PLE and SLE), SUNAT doesn’t generate a proposal; the taxpayer enters all sales and purchases information and generates the records. With the SIRE, however, SUNAT uses information from its Electronic Invoice System (Sistema de Emisión Eletrónica – SEE) to create a proposal of the RVIE and RCE, which the taxpayer submits in each declaration period. The record is updated daily with the information received on the previous day.

The RCE has certain peculiarities compared with the RVIE, already in use. The RCE requires the generation of two separate files, the records of domestic and cross-border purchases. Even if no cross-border transactions are carried out, a blank RCE must still be submitted to SUNAT. Additionally, taxpayers may exclude specific purchase invoices and include them in the RCE at any time for 12 months from the invoice issuance date.

After the taxpayer’s revision, the RVIE and RCE are filed in conjunction, and a receipt status message (Constancia de Recepcion), containing relevant information, is delivered to the taxpayer’s electronic mailbox.

The SIRE can be accessed through the SUNAT portal, using the SIRE application installed on the taxpayer’s computer or through SUNAT’s API web service.

What changes for taxpayers?

Once taxpayers become obliged to the exclusive maintenance of sales and purchase records through the SIRE, they must discontinue keeping such records in the PLE, SLE or paper ledgers. However, because the SIRE covers the RVIE and RCE exclusively, taxpayers will still need to maintain the PLE, which contains all other ledgers.

This means taxpayers must be aware of the distinct set of rules applied to the PLE and the SIRE. An example is that the SIRE allows modification of an already “closed” record from a previous period without waiting until the next period, as with the PLE and SLE. In the SIRE, adjustments can be made at any time using the different annexes provided by SUNAT, with no limitations on the year the record was generated.

Another significant change is that taxpayers will no longer have to store, file and preserve electronic records since SUNAT will do this for them.

Gradual roll-out of the SIRE

Implementation of the SIRE will happen gradually, according to the following schedule:

  • October 2022: Taxpayers listed in Annex 7 of Resolution 40-2022/SUNAT
  • October, November and December 2022: Taxpayers who became obliged to keep ledgers electronically this year
  • January 2023: Taxpayers who on 31 December 2022 are already obliged to keep Records of Sales and Purchases and aren’t included in the previous groups
  • From the 3rd month following the month in which they become obliged to keep the Records of Sales and Purchases or from the period in which they voluntarily become e-invoice issuers in the SEE, whichever occurs first: Taxpayers who, as of 1 January 2023, are required to keep the Records of Sales and Purchases.

Taxpayers may also start using the SIRE voluntarily if they are obliged to keep the Records of Sales and Purchases and are enrolled in the SUNAT operations portal (clave SOL), according to the following calendar:

  • From the period October 2022 to the period December 2022: Taxpayers who are obliged to keep ledgers electronically during the periods when they are not obliged to use the SIRE
  • As of the October 2022 period: Taxpayers not obliged to keep Records of Sales and Purchases electronically

What’s next for the SIRE?

Resolution 40-2022/SUNAT becomes effective on 1 October 2022. However, because most companies in Peru are already obliged to keep Records of Sales and Purchases, the largest groups of taxpayers must be ready to comply with the new mandate starting 1 January 2023.

Take Action

Speak to our team if you have any questions about the latest tax requirements in Peru. Sovos has more than a decade of experience keeping clients up to date with e-invoicing mandates all over the world.

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Author

Kelly Muniz

Kelly Muniz is a Junior Regulatory Counsel at Sovos. Based in Stockholm and originally from Brazil, Kelly earned a Bachelor’s degree in Law in her home country, where she worked as a licensed lawyer. She also holds a Master’s degree in EU Business Law from Lund University in Sweden.
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