,

Preparing for Greece’s Annual IPT Report

Rahul Lawlor
March 9, 2022

With a new month comes yet another report due in the Insurance Premium Tax (IPT) sphere. Insurance companies covering risks in Greece must report their insurance policies triggered in 2021 in the form of the Greek annual report. This is due by 31 March 2022.

Let us cast our minds back, in late 2019 this report came to fruition after previously being ratified in legislation released in 2016. At the time, due to the delay in implementation, the report was backdated, and insurers faced the challenge of submitting transactional level details for the period 2016-2018 in a short space of time.

There was however a precedent for such a dramatic change. And those who experienced the change with the Spanish Consorcio de Compensacion de Seguros submission would have experienced a sense of déjà vu with this development. Similarly, some insurers may be experiencing all too familiar issues now with the change in Portuguese Stamp Duty submission.

The market initially struggled with the Greek annual report due to the level of details required. In particular, the VAT/tax registration number was often not being collected from the Insured. Furthermore, with legacy systems still in use some of the other details in the report weren’t readily available. What this meant in a lot of cases for the Insurer was the painstaking and often time consuming process of going back to the policyholder to collect such information.

Greek annual IPT report

What about the report itself? The Greek annual report is a transactional level declaration on excel, which requires the following details to be populated:

  • Policy number
  • Invoice number
  • Invoice date
  • Insured
  • VAT/tax registration number
  • Class of business
  • Premium
  • IPT rate
  • IPT

The standard IPT rate in Greece is currently 15% with the 20% rate reserved for risks covering fire. Where there is a multi-risk policy covering both rates, the premiums must be apportioned on a per rate basis and therefore split out into two different lines.

Thankfully exempt premiums are not required on the report which somewhat eases the burden.

But what about cases where it was simply not possible to collect this information? This was an issue we’ve seen for some of our IPT customers where incomplete reports were submitted. So far, we haven’t experienced pushback from the tax authority for the omission of certain details, but we cannot guarantee this will continue to be the case.

Easing the pain of IPT reporting in Greece

Preparation is key. And education is key. This annual report is here to stay so the Insurer must be prepared well in advance that such details will be required and they should aim to collect this information on an ongoing basis rather than at the last moment. In some cases, an update in software will be required as the current systems may not have the capability to capture the required data. Furthermore, all relevant parties in the data supply chain should be educated on the importance of collecting the details. We believe that more countries will implement transactional reports in the coming years, so it would be prudent to set up certain controls now, to help prepare and ease the burden later.

As the world of IPT compliance is so fragmented across territories, keeping abreast of changes in reporting requirements can be challenging. Our team of experts can guide you through the details and ensure you are on the right compliance path.

Take Action

Need help with IPT requirements in Greece? Get in touch about the benefits a managed service provider can offer to ease your IPT compliance burden.

Sign up for Email Updates

Stay up to date with the latest tax and compliance updates that may impact your business.

Author

Rahul Lawlor

Rahul is a compliance services manager, responsible for overseeing the delivery of indirect tax compliance services for a portfolio of global insurers. He joined Sovos in 2016 after completing a Financial Maths degree from the University of Surrey.
Share This Post

EMEA VAT & Fiscal Reporting
November 29, 2022
Expert Series Part V: New Roles for IT in the Wake of Expanding Global Mandates

Part V of V – Christiaan Van Der Valk, vice president, strategy and regulatory, Sovos  Click here to read part IV of the series.   Government-mandated e-invoicing laws are making their way across nearly every region of the globe, bringing more stringent mandates and expectations on businesses. Inserted into every aspect of your operation, governments are […]

EMEA IPT
November 23, 2022
Fire Brigade Tax in Slovenia

Problems encountered with Fire Brigade Tax rate increase in Slovenia Slovenia’s Fire Brigade Tax (FBT) has changed. The rate increased from 5% to 9%. This came into effect on 1 October 2022. The first submission deadline followed on 15 November 2022. Unfortunately, the transition has been plagued by problems. We discuss some issues and how […]

E-Invoicing Compliance EMEA
November 22, 2022
E-invoicing and Fiscal Digitization in Africa

African countries are following e-invoicing and continuous transaction control trends implemented rapidly by many countries around the globe. Each country in the continent is developing their variation of a tax digitization system. This means there is currently no standardisation with compliance requirements differing in each jurisdiction. A common transaction reporting feature among African countries is […]

EMEA VAT & Fiscal Reporting
November 22, 2022
Expert Series Part IV: New Roles for IT in the Wake of Expanding Global Mandates

Part IV of V – Ryan Ostilly, vice president of product and GTM strategy EMEA & APAC, Sovos Click here to read part III of the series.   Government-mandated e-invoicing laws are making their way across nearly every region of the globe, bringing more stringent mandates and expectations on businesses. Inserted into every aspect of your […]

E-Invoicing Compliance EMEA
November 16, 2022
Denmark E-Invoicing Requirements

New bookkeeping law – Lov om bogføring On 19 May 2022, the Danish Parliament passed a new bookkeeping law – Lov om bogføring – introducing requirements for companies to use a digital bookkeeping system. Section 16 of the Law requires many Danish companies to use a digital bookkeeping system and make their bookings electronically. The final […]