Practical Considerations for EORI Numbers

Alex Smith
July 6, 2022

The EU and the UK use the Economic Operators Registration and Identification System (EORI) to identify traders.

What is an EORI number?

Businesses and people wishing to trade in the EU and the UK must use the EORI number as an identification number in all customs procedures when exchanging information with customs administrations. The EU has one standard identification number across the EU, while the UK requires a separate GB EORI number for trade in the UK post-Brexit.

The purpose of having one standard ID in the EU is that it creates efficiency for both traders and the customs authorities. However, it’s vital to ensure all aspects of the system are considered.

Who needs an EORI number?

The primary need for an EORI number is to be able to lodge a customs declaration for both imports and exports. Guidance is that a trader should obtain an EORI number in the first country of import or export. Carriers will also require an EORI number.

EORI number format

The EORI number exists in two parts:

  • The country code of the issuing Member State; followed by
  • A code or number that is unique in the Member State

The UK has also adopted this format, with both GB EORI numbers for trade into Great Britain (GB) and an XI EORI number for trade via the Northern Ireland protocol. The UK and EU have online databases where it is possible to check the status of an EORI number.

GB and XI EORI numbers

Since the UK left the EU, it is now required to have a separate GB EORI number to import and export from GB. This number will not be valid in the EU. However, should businesses be trading from Northern Ireland, then due to the Northern Ireland protocol, it is possible to apply for an XI EORI number to import into the EU.

Initially, after the introduction of the XI prefix, there were several reported issues. They included tax authorities being unable to recognise XI EORI numbers or link them to existing EU VAT numbers. Often it is the case that businesses have found it simpler to cancel an XI EORI number and apply for an EU EORI number in a Member State, particularly if that Member State is the main point of entry for imports into the EU.

Practical issues around EORIs

Some of the most common issues we see at Sovos include:

  • Businesses not having an EORI before starting an import and goods being stuck at the customs border.
  • Traders being told they need an EORI number in every Member State of import – however, this is not the case, and usually the reason for the customs delay is another matter.
  • Businesses not linking the EU EORI to their other EU VAT registrations.
  • Traders being told they need an EU address for the EORI – this is normally related to indirect customs representation, which we covered in our last article.
  • Businesses thinking it’s possible to use their carrier’s EORI number.

How Sovos can help

Sovos provides an EORI registration service for traders who must apply for an EORI number. We can also link any existing EU VAT numbers to the EORI to ensure that customs declarations can be logged correctly, ensuring a smooth process and avoiding delays.

Take Action

Contact us if you need help with VAT compliance.

Sign up for Email Updates

Stay up to date with the latest tax and compliance updates that may impact your business.

Author

Alex Smith

As a Director and member of the Consulting Services team within Managed Services, Alex has worked at Sovos since 2012. At Sovos Alex specialises in providing cross-border advice to a wide range of businesses delivering detailed analyses, reports and contract reviews regarding VAT/GST systems within the EU and beyond. Alex supports many businesses both from a consulting perspective and also by overseeing their VAT compliance obligations. Alex has worked in Indirect Tax since 2005 and his previous experience comes from working in the Big 4. Prior to joining Sovos, Alex worked as a GST consultant in New Zealand, which gave him the opportunity to develop an understanding of international GST and customs duties. Alex also spent several years in London, working in a middle markets VAT team gaining wide exposure to European VAT law. Alex is a full member of the Chartered Institute of Taxation and additionally holds a Master’s degree in Taxation.
Share This Post

EMEA VAT & Fiscal Reporting
November 29, 2022
Expert Series Part V: New Roles for IT in the Wake of Expanding Global Mandates

Part V of V – Christiaan Van Der Valk, vice president, strategy and regulatory, Sovos  Click here to read part IV of the series.   Government-mandated e-invoicing laws are making their way across nearly every region of the globe, bringing more stringent mandates and expectations on businesses. Inserted into every aspect of your operation, governments are […]

EMEA IPT
November 23, 2022
Fire Brigade Tax in Slovenia

Problems encountered with Fire Brigade Tax rate increase in Slovenia Slovenia’s Fire Brigade Tax (FBT) has changed. The rate increased from 5% to 9%. This came into effect on 1 October 2022. The first submission deadline followed on 15 November 2022. Unfortunately, the transition has been plagued by problems. We discuss some issues and how […]

E-Invoicing Compliance EMEA
November 22, 2022
E-invoicing and Fiscal Digitization in Africa

African countries are following e-invoicing and continuous transaction control trends implemented rapidly by many countries around the globe. Each country in the continent is developing their variation of a tax digitization system. This means there is currently no standardisation with compliance requirements differing in each jurisdiction. A common transaction reporting feature among African countries is […]

EMEA VAT & Fiscal Reporting
November 22, 2022
Expert Series Part IV: New Roles for IT in the Wake of Expanding Global Mandates

Part IV of V – Ryan Ostilly, vice president of product and GTM strategy EMEA & APAC, Sovos Click here to read part III of the series.   Government-mandated e-invoicing laws are making their way across nearly every region of the globe, bringing more stringent mandates and expectations on businesses. Inserted into every aspect of your […]

E-Invoicing Compliance EMEA
November 16, 2022
Denmark E-Invoicing Requirements

New bookkeeping law – Lov om bogføring On 19 May 2022, the Danish Parliament passed a new bookkeeping law – Lov om bogføring – introducing requirements for companies to use a digital bookkeeping system. Section 16 of the Law requires many Danish companies to use a digital bookkeeping system and make their bookings electronically. The final […]