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Poland: Insurance Ombudsman Contribution

Kateryna Binkowska
December 15, 2021

Currently, Poland doesn’t have an Insurance Premium Tax (IPT). Instead, there is a parafiscal tax called Insurance Ombudsman Contribution (IOC). It is currently charged at a rate of 0.02% and was effective from 1 January 2020 for all insurance companies operating under Freedom of Services (FOS) in Poland.

IOC applies to all 18 classes of non-life insurance. It is applicable to all insurance companies either selling insurance in Poland or collecting premiums from Polish persons. Prior to its origination date of 1 February 2014, it only applied to domestic insurers or foreign insurers with Polish branches.

The basis for IOC is the premium that must be paid to the insurer to obtain the insurance cover.

Insurance Ombudsman Contribution Reporting

Reporting for IOC can be tricky because of the different name and numbering system for quarterly declarations. For Example: Quarter I (Quarter 1) of the current year covers October, November and December of the previous year. The quarterly submission is due 90 days from the reporting period. In this example, Q1’s declaration must be filed by 31 March of the current year.

All the payments made throughout the year are considered prepayments or advance payments. For instance, the liabilities that arose in Q1 2021 are declared in the Q2 2021 tax period as an advanced payment for Q2 2021.

The Annual Report is due by 30 June of the following year. This report is submitted to the Insurance Ombudsman summarising the actual premiums received in the previous year (i.e., for 2020, a report is submitted by 30 June 2021 summarising the total amount of premiums received by the insurer in 2020).

The Insurance Ombudsman then determines its funding requirements, and an adjustment is made based on the difference between the insurer’s share of the market percentage multiplied by the funding requirements and the previously made payments for the reporting year.

The Ombudsman’s adjustment may result in the tax authorities requiring additional funds or providing a refund. Either result is communicated by the authorities through Annual Settlement Letters that usually arrive by the end of October.

Insurers are obligated to keep records of insurance contracts and the documents required for tax declaration for five years from the contract’s expiry date.

If the taxpayer doesn’t declare and remit the tax in accordance with the regulations, the relevant authority may demand delayed interest and require an assessment of the tax. In such cases, the court can award a penalty fee and/or imprisonment of the company’s management for up to three years, as per the fiscal penalty code from 10 September 1999.

For any insurance company operating under FOS in Poland, understanding the details of the Insurance Ombudsman Contribution and the reporting requirements are key to ensuring compliance.

Take Action

Need help to ensure your business stays compliant with current and upcoming changes to IOC? Contact the Sovos team today.

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Author

Kateryna Binkowska

Kateryna is a senior compliance services representative for IPT and joined Sovos in 2019. She has a Bachelor Degree in Economics and Management from the National Economic University, Kiev, Ukraine and from The Institute of Certified Bookkeepers, London.
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