Extra Profit Tax: An Introduction to Supplemental IPT in Hungary

Edit Buliczka
July 11, 2022

As of 1 July 2022, Hungary introduced an Extra Profit Tax scheme, which levies supplemental Insurance Premium Tax (IPT) on insurance premiums. The introduction of the Extra Profit Tax scheme is a temporary measure and aims to cover the increased governmental costs caused by the conflict in Ukraine. The Extra Profit Tax scheme is applicable not only for the insurance sector but also for other sectors, including airlines, medical, energy, telecommunications and banking.

The following blog gives an overview of this tax, highlighting some interesting features and anomalies around this tax.

What is Hungary’s Supplemental IPT?

On 4 June 2022, a Government Decree was published in the Hungarian Official Gazette, numbered 197/2022, with the title “About Extra Profit Taxes”. One may wonder why a government decree regulates a new tax method. To answer this question, we need to research and read the Hungarian Constitution and another law about special measurements in case of catastrophes. Adding two new sections to the mentioned law on 25 May 2022 made it possible for the government to introduce the Extra Profit Taxes in a government decree instead of adjusting the relevant laws. The Extra Profit Tax scheme includes the Supplemental IPT. Although the Government Decree refers to particular tax laws, such as the 102/2012 IPT Law, the Extra Profit Tax regulations are not and will not be built into these tax laws.

Overview of the Supplemental IPT

Supplemental IPT is a temporary tax effective as of 1 July 2022 for 18 months and will end on 31 December 2023. This tax is due on non-life and life insurance policies written by both Freedom of Establishment and Freedom of Services insurers. A similar sliding scale system on the income collected is applicable for this new supplemental IPT as it is for the existing IPT. The scales for 2022 are as follows:

  1. Under 1 billion Hungarian Forint (HUF)
  2. Over 1 billion and below 18 billion HUF
  3. Over 18 billion HUF

While for 2023, the scales are the following:

  1. Under 2 billion HUF
  2. Over 2 billion and below 36 billion HUF
  3. Over 36 billion HUF

The rates vary depending on when the taxpayer collected the premium and the type of insurance policies. In 2022 the rates are higher for non-life and life insurance policies than in 2023, also noting that the life rates are half of those applied to non-life policies. For further details about the rates, please read our tax alert, Hungary: Supplemental IPT Introduced Due to Ukraine Conflict.

The declaration and the payment are due by 31 January 2023 and 31 January 2024, respectively. There is also a prepayment obligation for both years with due dates of 30 November 2022 and 31 May 2023. For further details about the prepayment, please also refer to the abovementioned tax alert.

Interesting features about the Supplemental IPT

The introduction of this tax is one of the features which is unique in taxation. In Hungary, in normal circumstances, taxes are introduced, or the existing taxes are modified via laws. Generally, tax laws should be published at least 30 days before they come into effect. In the case of the Extra Profit Tax scheme, the legislative body fulfilled none of the above.

Another interesting feature to mention is that although it is called supplemental insurance premium tax, it is also due on life insurance policies. In Hungary, there is no existing insurance premium tax on life policies as these policies are exempt.

No prepayment is due for the existing IPT, but prepayment is due to be paid for the supplemental IPT.

Supplemental IPT is a type of Extra Profit Tax, but it seems that there is no separate tax code given to it. The Supplemental IPT should be declared on the IPT declaration form and paid to the same Hungarian Tax Office account as the existing IPT.

Anomalies and open questions around Supplemental IPT

The base period to calculate 2022 prepayment is one year, although the supplemental tax is due only for the second half of 2022. On the other hand, the prepayment for the whole 2023 year is equal to the amount of the half-yearly 2022 supplemental tax. As such, insurance companies will likely overpay the tax with the 2022 prepayment. This overpaid tax will then need to be reclaimed or can be offset against the existing IPT or used for the 2023 prepayment or 2023 supplemental IPT. Is it for purpose or just a mistake and it will be amended?

In the guidance issued by the Hungarian Tax Office on 1 July 2022 on supplemental insurance tax rules for 2022, the tax authority mentioned that taxpayers should declare the supplemental tax on the standard IPT tax declaration form, 2220. However, the tax authority did not update the form by 1 July 2022. As the due date of the prepayment and the supplemental tax differ from that of the existing IPT, there is still an open question of how the form will look to make the distinction between the existing IPT, the prepayment and the supplemental tax. Hopefully, a new return template will be published soon to answer these questions.

As explained above, there is still ambiguity and questions around this new tax. Sovos is dedicated to keeping our clients up to date and informing you as soon as the clarified information is available. Please contact our dedicated IPT compliance team if you have any questions.

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Author

Edit Buliczka

Edit is a senior regulatory counsel. She joined Sovos in January 2016 and has extensive IPT knowledge and experience. Her role ensures the IPT teams and systems at Sovos are always updated with legislative changes. She is a Hungarian registered tax expert and chartered accountant and has worked for companies in Hungary including Deloitte and KPMG and as an indirect tax manager she worked for AIG in Budapest. She graduated with an economist degree from Budapest Business School, faculty of finance and accountancy and also she has a postgraduate diploma from ELTE Legal University in Budapest.
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