Currently, Poland doesn’t have an Insurance Premium Tax (IPT). Instead, there is a parafiscal tax called Insurance Ombudsman Contribution (IOC). It is currently charged at a rate of 0.02% and was effective from 1 January 2020 for all insurance companies operating under Freedom of Services (FOS) in Poland.

IOC applies to all 18 classes of non-life insurance. It is applicable to all insurance companies either selling insurance in Poland or collecting premiums from Polish persons. Prior to its origination date of 1 February 2014, it only applied to domestic insurers or foreign insurers with Polish branches.

The basis for IOC is the premium that must be paid to the insurer to obtain the insurance cover.

Insurance Ombudsman Contribution Reporting

Reporting for IOC can be tricky because of the different name and numbering system for quarterly declarations. For Example: Quarter I (Quarter 1) of the current year covers October, November and December of the previous year. The quarterly submission is due 90 days from the reporting period. In this example, Q1’s declaration must be filed by 31 March of the current year.

All the payments made throughout the year are considered prepayments or advance payments. For instance, the liabilities that arose in Q1 2021 are declared in the Q2 2021 tax period as an advanced payment for Q2 2021.

The Annual Report is due by 30 June of the following year. This report is submitted to the Insurance Ombudsman summarising the actual premiums received in the previous year (i.e., for 2020, a report is submitted by 30 June 2021 summarising the total amount of premiums received by the insurer in 2020).

The Insurance Ombudsman then determines its funding requirements, and an adjustment is made based on the difference between the insurer’s share of the market percentage multiplied by the funding requirements and the previously made payments for the reporting year.

The Ombudsman’s adjustment may result in the tax authorities requiring additional funds or providing a refund. Either result is communicated by the authorities through Annual Settlement Letters that usually arrive by the end of October.

Insurers are obligated to keep records of insurance contracts and the documents required for tax declaration for five years from the contract’s expiry date.

If the taxpayer doesn’t declare and remit the tax in accordance with the regulations, the relevant authority may demand delayed interest and require an assessment of the tax. In such cases, the court can award a penalty fee and/or imprisonment of the company’s management for up to three years, as per the fiscal penalty code from 10 September 1999.

For any insurance company operating under FOS in Poland, understanding the details of the Insurance Ombudsman Contribution and the reporting requirements are key to ensuring compliance.

Take Action

Need help to ensure your business stays compliant with current and upcoming changes to IOC? Contact the Sovos team today.

The introduction of the new Portuguese Stamp Duty system has arguably been one of the most extensive changes within IPT reporting in 2021 even though the latest reporting system wasn’t accompanied by any changes to the tax rate structure.

The new reporting requirements were initially scheduled to start with January 2020 returns. However this was postponed until April 2020 and once again until January 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

How does this affect reporting?

In addition to the information currently requested, mandatory information required for successful submission of the returns now includes:

Lessons learned and how Sovos helps you adapt

Our reporting systems have evolved to help customers meet these new requirements.

For example, our technical department have built a formula that confirms a valid ID to ease data validation and reporting. Consequently, a sense check was built within our systems to determine whether an ID is valid.

With the recent change in the treatment of negative Stamp Duty lines, we’ve also changed our calculations to account for two contrasting methods of treating negatives within our systems.

Previously, both the Portuguese Stamp Duty and parafiscal authorities held identical requirements for the submission of negative lines. However, the introduction of the more complex Stamp Duty reporting system called for amendments to the initial declaration of the policy.

Understandably, this new requirement is a more judicious approach towards tax reporting and will likely be introduced within more tax systems in the future.

Looking ahead

As with any new reporting system, changes within your monthly procedures are necessary. Our IPT compliance processes and software are updated as and when regulatory changes occur providing peace of mind for our customers.

And with each new reporting system, we learn more and more about how tax authorities around the world are trying to enter the digital age with more streamlined practices, knowledge and insight to increase efficiency and close the tax gap.

Take Action

Contact our experts for help with your Portugal Stamp Duty reporting requirements.