VAT Digitization in Eastern Europe


A Quick Guide to E-invoicing and Real-Time Reporting Tax regulations in Eastern European countries are complex but that shouldn’t be a reason not to do business there. If you’re responsible for VAT compliance, this ebook provides key details of the varying VAT digitisation mandates and business requirements across the region:
  • Understand how to comply with the e-invoicing and reporting in Eastern Europe
  • Deep dives into Hungary, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Slovakia
  • Must-read for tax professionals and consultants

A Quick Guide to E-invoicing and Real-Time Reporting

Tax regulations in Eastern European countries are complex but that shouldn’t be a reason not to do business there. If you’re responsible for VAT compliance, this ebook provides key details of the varying VAT digitisation mandates and business requirements across the region:

  • Understand how to comply with the e-invoicing and reporting in Eastern Europe
  • Deep dives into Hungary, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Slovakia
  • Must-read for tax professionals and consultants

Get the ebook

Who should read this ebook?

Tax professional

  • Need to be up to date with Eastern European regulations
  • Understand system requirements for real-time reporting and e-invoicing
  • Prepare and future-proof for upcoming tax digitization

Consultancy

  • Ensure best practices for clients
  • Keep up to date with latest regulations and developments
  • Confidently navigate the tax landscape to help clients with planning

Written by tax experts and regulatory specialists

Tax administrations continue to insert themselves into the invoicing process or demand detailed records within a matter of hours or days of transactions. Many have introduced continuous transaction controls (CTCs)and are seeing the benefits of closing their country’s VAT gap and gaining granular, real-time or near real-time insight. Eastern Europe is part of this trend, moving forward rapidly with real-time reporting and e-invoicing initiatives.

The challenge of VAT digitization in Eastern Europe

Each Eastern European country has a different approach to CTCs. These differences could extend further as mandates evolve and businesses have to deal with new filing formats like SAF-T and real-time reporting to stay tax compliant. Understanding the varying demands of VAT compliance is key for any business operating in or looking to expand into the region. With this guide you’ll gain a greater understanding of the requirements across the region. Our deep dive into key countries will help you comply with VAT regulations now and prepare for upcoming mandates.

Take a look at what's inside:

Regional tax knowledge

Detailed country guide

How to expand with confidence

What this guide to Eastern Europe e-invoicing and reporting compliance covers

Get our guide for a comprehensive picture of CTCs in Eastern Europe and the many requirements that vary country to country. This includes invoice format, connectivity, data requirements, how to submit, archiving, legacy systems, technologies and business processes-all of which need to be reconsidered and rewired to be compliant. We also conduct extensive reviews of key Eastern European economies as well as uncover what’s on the horizon in one of the most important countries in the region, Slovakia:

  • Continuous transactions controls –what are they?
  • Common clearance system features
  • Clearance regimes
  • Stay compliant with evolving CTC regulations
  • A close look at e-invoicing in the region
  • Romania
  • Poland
  • Hungary
  • Serbia
  • Slovakia
  • Compliance in Eastern Europe
  • How Sovos can help

The CTC landscape in Eastern Europe is constantly evolving, with countries at different stages of their journeys.

The Czech Republic, Austria, Croatia and Montenegro all currently allow post-audit invoicing.

Countries that have already implemented CTC regimes (either e-reporting or e-invoicing) where paper invoicing is still possible include Hungary, Albania and Greece.

In some cases, such as in Slovenia and Bulgaria, there are CTC schemes planned but details have yet to be specified.

Others have outlined their specifications and implemented voluntary schemes. Our guide covers some of these countries, providing details about the scope, document flows, key requirements and timelines of their regimes.

Romania –A sneak peak

There are three requirements for taxpayers in Romania:

  1. Mandatory e-invoicing for B2G transactions
  2. Mandatory e-invoicing for high-risk products
  3. Electronic transport mandate

Taxpayers are required to use the Romania e-transport system to issue an e-transport document regarding the transport of high fiscal risk products before transportation of goods begins. This includes data regarding the sender, recipient, goods, places of loading and unloading and details of the means of transport and carrier.

Sovos provides a cost-effective, secure, global solution capable of withstanding disruption prompted by the worldwide CTC trend.

Our unique cloud solutions keep you compliant in 60+ countries and our tax experts ensure your business complies with the latest regulations and their requirements.

Market-leading 40+ year history in global regulatory monitoring and analysis

One vendor, one technical interface

Embedded in 60+ partners (SAP, Ariba, Coupa, IBM and more)

Simple API for plug-and-play interoperability

Evolves with your technology and process choices

Sovos’ VAT Compliance Solution Suite includes both CTC reporting and CTC e-invoicing as integral components of a fully scalable solution suite and includes Sovos Periodic Reporting, SAF-T and Sovos eArchive.

Problems encountered with Fire Brigade Tax rate increase in Slovenia

Slovenia’s Fire Brigade Tax (FBT) has changed.

The rate increased from 5% to 9%. This came into effect on 1 October 2022. The first submission deadline followed on 15 November 2022.

Unfortunately, the transition has been plagued by problems. We discuss some issues and how Sovos is approaching them.

Slovenia’s new tax return

We had anticipated that the tax return would remain unchanged, with the premium reduction at 20% and the standard at 100% carrying over from the previous version. Instead, the Slovenian tax authorities overhauled the return entirely. This included:

With the combinations, a return could include up to 30 different lines, but the return only includes four – one for each combination.

This layout suggests that the tax authority wishes to combine policies with the same rates, e.g., 100% and 9%.

This differs from previous returns.

Previously each class of business had a separate line. Sovos has contacted the tax authority about the most compliant way to complete this.

Telephone number information on tax return

Some aesthetic changes caused unexpected issues.

Telephone numbers now have a set number of boxes instead of an open line.

This change doesn’t accommodate longer phone numbers. For example, a UK phone number doesn’t fit.

This requires clarification from the tax authorities:

Postcodes also have the same issue.

As frustrating as these issues are, there is a more significant frustration.

The amount of time between the new return’s publishing and the first submission deadline The new return was published online roughly three weeks before the deadline.

This was a very short turnaround to upload the returns to the systems and solve any problems that may have arisen, as well as informing clients about any new information that may be required here.

Fortunately, no new information was required. Short deadlines to comply with new tax return requirements are a frequent problem we encounter.

Conflicting information about Slovenia’s new Fire Brigade Tax return

Guidance from the tax authority has been inconsistent at best.

For example, the law passed in May 2022 stated the following:

The new Fire Brigade Tax rate would apply to the cash received date. The 9% rate applies to any premiums generated after 1 October 2022.

However, guidance on the official Slovenian tax authority website stated that if the inception date for the policy was before 1 October, the 5% rate would still apply. This is regardless of when the premium was collected. This applies until the policy is renewed. At this point, the 9% rate is applied. This is a significant conflict. It’s potentially millions of euros difference in the amount due. Don’t forget the countless corrections required to balance the books.

As well as being issued late, multiple tax return versions were published online. Only one had the updated tax rate included. The return disappeared from the website and was replaced by the original return.

The English translation and other versions haven’t been updated – this is still the case even after the deadline.

Finally, the guidance on the tax authority’s website states it’s mandatory to submit the FBT returns online through the tax authority portal.

However, official communications from the tax authority directly informed us at Sovos that submissions were required by email only.

Again, this is a significant conflict. Submitting returns through the wrong channel would result in the tax authority declaring the submission late and levying fines.

Next steps with Slovenia’s new tax return

We have communicated all these issues to the Slovenian tax authority. We haven’t received a response yet, but we will update this blog as soon as we have more information.

Sovos has a wealth of experience that enables us to solve issues that arise and ensure our customers remain compliant with the latest tax requirements.

Need help with Fire Brigade Tax requirements in Slovenia?

Want to ensure compliance with the latest Fire Brigade Tax requirements? Speak to our experts.

African countries are following e-invoicing and continuous transaction control trends implemented rapidly by many countries around the globe.

Each country in the continent is developing their variation of a tax digitization system. This means there is currently no standardisation with compliance requirements differing in each jurisdiction.

A common transaction reporting feature among African countries is the use of electronic or virtual fiscal devices. Electronic fiscal devices are cash registers with software and direct communication to the tax authority. Virtual fiscal devices serve the same purpose but without the hardware component.

However, reporting transactions is one of many fiscal digitization processes applied by African countries. E-invoicing is on the agenda for several authorities, including Nigeria, Kenya and Uganda. In this blog we explain the key features of these systems.

E-invoicing in Africa: Countries

Nigeria: Automated Tax Administration System and Cross-Border e-Invoicing

Taxpayers report their transactions electronically to the tax authority through the Automated Tax Administration System (ATAS), established for electronic VAT compliance purposes.

In addition to this e-reporting function, as of February 2022, all import and export operations need an authenticated e-invoice issued according to the format specified by the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN).

The CBN has introduced the Cross-Border e-Invoicing program, where suppliers and buyers operating in imports and exports register on the dedicated electronic platform. There are exemptions to obligatory e-invoices based on operations and taxpayers, such as the transaction value within the invoice.

Kenya: Tax Invoice Management System

Businesses subject to VAT must report their e-invoices to the Tax Invoice Management System (TIMS), which requires taxpayers to install, and use approved electronic tax register machines. These tax register machines connect to the tax authority’s online system. There is a mandatory format for submitting e-invoices to the tax authority.

Regarding the full implementation, the Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) announced additional time to comply with the TIMS after the grace period, and taxpayers are expected to be fully prepared by the end of November 2022.

Uganda: Electronic Fiscal Receipting and Invoicing System

The Electronic Fiscal Receipting and Invoicing System (EFRIS) covers invoices and receipts of B2B, B2G and B2C transactions. Taxpayers must send e-invoices to EFRIS through electronic fiscal devices or via an API connection between the taxpayer and EFRIS. When initiating a transaction, transaction details are transmitted in real time to EFRIS to generate an e-receipt or e-invoice.

Africa’s future e-invoicing landscape

Given the growth in jurisdictions applying mandatory e-invoicing and e-reporting and the common agenda set by African Union that also refers to tax control and traceability, we can expect more African countries to introduce similar e-invoicing systems in the near future. The countries that follow will likely learn from the pioneers, leading to a more uniform development of tax digitization in Africa.

Need help for E-invoicing in Africa?

Ask our tax experts about e-invoicing compliance in African countries. Simply get in touch.

Update: 3 November 2022 by Russell Hughes

Making Tax Digital – Filing VAT Returns through Online VAT Account to become redundant

From Tuesday 1 November 2022, businesses filing VAT returns in the UK will no longer be able to submit via an existing online VAT account unless HMRC has agreed to an exemption from Making Tax Digital (MTD). Businesses that file annual VAT returns will still be able to use their VAT online account until 15 May 2023.

By law, all VAT-registered businesses must now sign up to Making Tax Digital and use compatible software for keeping VAT records and filing returns. HMRC has advised that from January 2023, any VAT registered businesses that fail to sign up for MTD and file returns through MTD-compatible software will incur .

Making Tax Digital’s aim is to help businesses get tax right first time by reducing errors, making it easier for them to manage their tax affairs by going digital, and consequently helping them to grow. More than 1.8 million businesses are already benefitting from the service, and more than 19 million returns have been successfully submitted through Making Tax Digital compatible software so far.

How to sign up to Making Tax Digital

If a business hasn’t already signed up to Making Tax Digital or started using compatible software, they must follow these steps now:

Small businesses

If your turnover is under the VAT threshold of £85,000 and you haven’t signed up to Making Tax Digital in time to file your next return by 7 November 2022, you can still use your existing VAT online account for that return only.

New businesses

New businesses not yet registered for VAT will be automatically signed up for Making Tax Digital while registering for VAT through HMRC’s new VAT Registration Service (VRS).  Registering on the VRS provides a quicker VAT registration and improved security. It also helps new businesses fully comply with MTD requirements from day one, subject to using the correct software.

Still have questions about Making Tax Digital compliance? Speak to our tax experts.

Update: 17 March 2022 by Andrew Decker

Making Tax Digital for VAT – Expansion

Beginning in April 2022, the requirements for Making Tax Digital (MTD) for VAT will be expanded to all VAT registered businesses. MTD for VAT has been mandatory for all companies with annual turnover above the VAT registration threshold of £85,000 since April 2019. As a result, this year’s expansion is expected to impact smaller businesses whose turnover is below the threshold but who are nonetheless registered for UK VAT.

 

Update: 3 March 2021 by Andrew Decker

UK’s Making Tax Digital – 1 April Brings End to Soft Landing Period

Since April 2019, the UK has required the submission of VAT returns and the storage of VAT records to be completed in accordance with the requirements of its Making Tax Digital (MTD) regulations.

One of these requirements is that data transfer between software programs be achieved through ‘digital links.’ This requirement was initially waived during a ’soft landing’ period which is set to expire on 1 April 2021. As a result, to remain complaint with MTD requirements, businesses must ensure they can meet the digital link requirement.

What are the basic requirements of MTD?

Under MTD, businesses must digitally file VAT returns using ‘functional compatible software’ which can connect to HMRC’s API. Additionally, businesses must use software to keep digital records of specified VAT related documents.

What is a digital link and when is it required?

A digital link is required whenever a business is using multiple pieces of software to store and transmit its VAT records and returns pursuant to MTD requirements. For example, if a business stores its VAT records in its accounting program but then submits its VAT return using an approved piece of bridging software, the data must be transferred between the accounting and bridging software via a digital link.

A digital link occurs when a transfer or exchange of data is made, or can be made, electronically between software programs, products or applications without the need for or involvement of any manual intervention.

The key to this requirement is that once data has been entered into a business’s software there shouldn’t be any manual intervention in transferring it to another program. This means that data cannot be manually transcribed from one program into another. Additionally, using a ‘cut and paste’ feature to transfer data doesn’t constitute a digital link.

For example, manually typing or copying information from one spreadsheet into another doesn’t count as a digital link but connecting the two spreadsheets using a linking formula does.

Additional examples of digital links include:

The digital links requirement will apply to all businesses subject to MTD rules, however businesses that fulfill certain requirements can request an extension to delay the requirement.

For more information on MTD, including details on extension requests and criteria see VAT Notice 700/22: Making Tax Digital for VAT on HMRC’s website.

Important dates to remember regarding MTD for VAT

1 April 2019 –Business with annual turnover of £85,000 and over became liable to follow Making Tax Digital rule for VAT

1 April 2021 –Digital links requirement will be enforced

1 April 2022 – Taxpayers with turnover under £85,000 will be required to comply with making tax digital (MTD)

Need help with Making Tax Digital (MTD)?

Sovos’ Advanced Periodic Reporting technology is fully compliant with Making Tax Digital, including digital link.

Meet the Expert is our series of blogs where we share more about the team behind our innovative software and insurance premium tax (IPT) compliance services.

As a global organisation with indirect tax experts across all regions, our dedicated team are often the first to know about regulatory changes and developments in global tax regimes to support you in your tax compliance.

We spoke with Sean Burton, senior compliance services representative who explained Slovakia’s specific IPT reporting requirements and shared some of his top tips to ensure compliance.

Can you tell me about your role and what it involves (day to day and more strategic responsibility)?

I’m a senior compliance services representative for IPT at Sovos. I joined the company just over three years ago and have mainly worked with clients writing global insurance programmes, exposing me to a wide range of scenarios within IPT.

My day-to-day role now involves overseeing the review and return preparation process for associates and representatives’ data, ensuring accurate submissions are prepared in a timely manner. The final step in this sequence is for me to sign off the final returns and pass them to our client money team. Outside of this work I deal with client queries, assisting with more complex annual reporting requirements and submission of the Slovakian IPT returns.

Can you tell us about Slovakia’s specific IPT reporting requirements?

The IPT tax regime in Slovakia took over from the previous Non-Life Insurance Levy tax on 1 January 2019. Any policies incepted on or after this date are subject to the IPT tax as opposed to the old levy.

The tax rate remained the same at a flat 8% rate across all business classes.

There are three tax points for IPT in Slovakia:

  1. Booked date – when the premium receivable is booked into the system
  2. Cash received date – when the premium payment is received
  3. Payment due date – when the premium is due to be paid

This offers insurers greater flexibility with their tax points in comparison to other territories, allowing the insurer to pay taxes either upfront or spread across multiple returns in installments. The main point here is once a specific tax point has been selected, the insurer must use it for the next eight submission periods. After this they can change the tax point should they wish.

Slovakian IPT is submitted electronically via an online tax portal. The submission and payment are due at the end of each quarter.

What are some of the issues insurers face with IPT in Slovakia?

As with most territories that have moved to online filings, the Slovakia tax authorities now require more specific information for each policy. As a result, Sovos now requests an additional field in our data template so that we can report this accurately.

Type of movement:

E/R – Issuance of a premium/renewals: grouped on the tax return by class of business. It’s important to note that an overall negative position for a specific business class is not permissible and will be rejected in the Slovakian Tax Portal.

S – Supplementary premium: the case whereby a premium or part thereof, is increased, reduced or cancelled. These premiums are reported within Box 19 on the Slovakian IPT return, where the total can be either positive or negative.

C – Correction of error: In the case of a correction of error a supplementary declaration must be submitted for the appropriate period affected.

This can be a problem for insurers who haven’t previously collated this information and it’s not part of their current internal booking systems, which can take time to update.

Another issue for insurers writing policies with a long duration over a number of years is that whilst the IPT regime took over from the old Non-life insurance levy (NLIL), NLIL can still be due if the policy incepted prior to 2019. Therefore, it’s important for insurers to be aware of this distinction and ensure both taxes are paid accurately.

What are your top tips for Slovakian IPT reporting compliance?

My top tip for IPT reporting in Slovakia would be to collect as much detailed policy information as possible to complete the separate sections of the IPT return compliantly.

This will also help insurers be organised for any further updates to Slovakian reporting in the future. Requesting detailed policy information is a trend we’re seeing across all territories and insurers need to be prepared for this.

How can Sovos help insurers with IPT in Slovakia?

Firstly, at Sovos we have a good connection with local associates in Slovakia. This means we can keep our finger on the pulse with any IPT related legislative changes that arise in Slovakia.

Secondly, the online submission process requires each box to be manually inputted with information such as premium tax amounts, contact information and tax point selection. Leaving this process in our hands will certainly save insurers valuable time.

Get in touch with our experts

Have questions about IPT compliance? Speak to our tax experts or download our e-book, Indirect Tax Rules for Insurance Across the World.

France is implementing a decentralised continuous transaction control (CTC) system where domestic B2B e-invoicing constitutes the foundation of the system, adding e-reporting requirements for data relating to B2C and cross-border B2B transactions (sales and purchases).

Under this upcoming regime, data or invoices can be directly sent to the Invoicing Public Portal ‘PPF’ (Portail Public de Facturation, so far known as Chorus Pro) or to a Partner Dematerialization Platform ‘PDP’ (Plateformes de Dématerialisation Partenaires). In addition, there are also Dematerializing Operators (Operateurs de dématérialisation) that are connected to either the PPF or a PDP.

Requirements for these portal and platforms have been published.

New details on requirements for portals and obtaining PDP status

The Ministry of Economy published Decree No. 2022-1299 and Order of 7 October 2022 on the generalisation of e-invoicing in transactions between taxable persons for VAT and the transmission of transaction data (together known as ‘new legislation’),  providing long-awaited details for PDP operators and PPF.

The new legislation introduces rules concerning the application process for PDP operators. Although French establishment isn’t required, PDP operators must fulfill a number of requirements, such as operating their IT systems in the EU.

France is implementing a model where third-party service providers are authorised to transmit invoices between the transacting parties. With the mandatory use of the PPF or PDPs for exchanging e-invoices, trading parties cannot exchange invoices between them directly. Therefore, PDPs must be able to receive and send invoices in structured formats, whether the ones supported by the PPF (CII, UBL, or FACTUR-X) or any other required by their clients. Also, to ensure interoperability, PDPs are expected to connect with at least one other PDP. Besides this requirement, it’s stated by the new decree that PDPs must be able to send e-invoices to PDPs chosen by their recipients which implies a complete interoperability between PDPs.

Transitional period for submitting PDF invoices

It was previously announced that taxpayers could submit PDF invoices for a transitional period. The new legislation outlines the transitional period as until the end of 2027. During this period PDPs and PPF must be able to convert the PDF into one of the structured formats.

New details on e-invoicing and e-reporting in France

The new legislation also provides information about the content of e-invoices, which has new mandatory fields, and the content of transaction and payment data to be transmitted to the tax authority.

It also announced frequencies and dates of data transmission. Deadlines for transaction and payment data transmission are based on the tax regimes of taxpayers. For example, taxpayers subject to the normal monthly regime should transmit payment data within ten days after the end of the month.

With the aim of having traceability over documents, the lifecycle statuses of the domestic B2B e-invoices are exchanged between the parties and transmitted to the PPF. Lifecycle statuses that are mandatory (“Deposited”, “Rejected”, “Refused” and “Payment Received”) are listed in the new legislation.

Further details regarding the Central Directory, which consists of data to properly identify the recipient of the e-invoice and its platform, are provided within the Order.

The road ahead for service providers

PDP operator candidates can apply for registration as of Spring 2023 (precise date still to be confirmed), instead of September 2023 as previously set. From January 2024, a six-month test run is expected to be conducted for enterprises and PDPs before the implementation in July 2024.

Talk to a tax expert

Still have questions about France’s upcoming continuous transaction control mandate? Get in touch with our tax experts.

Space insurance and the application of IPT on these policies has been a talking point in recent months. The main question? Location of risk.

This blog considers the background and explores the current state of space insurance.

What does space insurance cover?

Space insurance typically provides a broad range of coverage relating to spacecraft, such as satellites and rockets, but also covers the vehicle used for launching the spacecraft.

Although not an exhaustive list, some of the classes of insurance set at European Union (EU) level that we expect to be included are:

How do you tax Space Insurance?

Given the different elements of coverage possible, it is important to tax each element appropriately.

For example, the portion of the coverage related to damage to the spacecraft itself (including fire) may result in certain parafiscal charges due on property and fire insurance in some countries.

On the other hand, the portion of the coverage relating to the transport of the spacecraft may benefit from one of the exemptions that exists in many EU jurisdictions for goods in transit insurance.

It is worth noting that the United Kingdom has an IPT exemption relating to contracts of insurance for the operation of spacecraft within certain classes of business (including those classes identified above). The scope includes the operation of the spacecraft during launch, flight, orbit or re-entry, and the operation of the launch vehicle and any business interruption cover. This does not, however, extend to risks relating to spacecraft construction.

How do you determine Location of Risk?

There may be multiple risk locations depending on the specific coverages provided on the policy.

When parts of a spacecraft are manufactured and then subsequently assembled, for example, they are considered moveable property and, as such, would be taxable in the property’s location based on EU rules, if contained in a building there.

When transporting spacecraft ahead of launch, then it would be taxable in the location of the establishment of the policyholder to which the insurance contract relates. Similarly, risks covering the launch, ongoing operation of the spacecraft once in orbit, and during the de-commissioning stage should be expected to be taxed in the same way.

From discussions within the market, we are aware that the practice has generally been to treat space policies as wholly exempt from IPT and parafiscal charges. This is rather than taking the approach to look at each element of the policy to see if they should be taxed, and if so, then how should the location of risk rules be applied to determine the correct country or countries.

Despite this practice, the market is presently rethinking its approach to taxing these policies. This is to mitigate the risk of assessments from EU tax authorities claiming for unpaid taxes. Subject to any future legal rulings affecting the market, the likely outcome is that IPT and parafiscal charges are charged as outlined unless there is a specific exemption.

Need help with space insurance?

Still trying to figure out how to approach space insurance? Get in touch with our IPT experts and request

In Italy, the discipline of transfer pricing states that in intra-group transactions between entities from different countries, where one is resident in Italy, transactions must take place on an arm’s length basis. In other words, transactions are based on freely competitive prices and under comparable circumstances.

Companies carefully treat the transfer pricing adjustments from a corporate income tax perspective. However, less attention is paid from a VAT perspective.

It’s worth mentioning that in most cases, the transfer price adjustments are profitability adjustments (rather than price) of the transactions carried out between associated companies.

However, treating the transfer pricing adjustments as outside the scope of VAT might cause problems in case of a tax authority audit and re-qualification of the transactions.

Italian tax authority clarifications

The issue of transfer pricing adjustments for VAT purposes is not expressly regulated by the Italian legislator, other EU Member State legislators or from an EU VAT legislative point of view. In the absence of an ad hoc provision, reference is made to EU and local legislation, and private and public rulings on a case-by-case analysis.

Regarding public rulings, Italian tax authorities published several responses in 2021.

With the last response to ruling no. 884 of 30 December 2021, inspired by EU Commission Working Paper n. 923 and VAT Expert Group document n. 071, Italian tax authorities clarified that to establish whether transfer pricing adjustments represent the consideration for a transaction relevant for VAT:

How will this affect my business?

In the 30 December 2021 ruling (no. 884), Italian tax authorities confirmed the adjustments in question were outside the scope of VAT following the transfer pricing adjustments. It stated for subsidiaries “the recognition of an extra cost aimed at lowering their operating margin“, wasn’t “directly related to the original supplies of finished products“.

The same outcome didn’t apply to ruling no. 529 of August 6, 2021.

In this case, at the time of the sale of the goods, the seller applied a provisional price.

That provisional price was then subject to adjustment on a quarterly basis, through the so-called “Profit True Up“. The result could consist either of a claim by the transferor against the transferee or, conversely, transferor’s debt.

In this specific case, Italian tax authorities found a “direct link between the sums determined in the final balance and the supplies” and concluded by determining the relevance of the transfer price adjustments made by the taxpayer for VAT purposes.

Final comments considering other tax authority approaches

Whether or not your business is operating in Italy, the above shows how important the potential VAT implications of transfer pricing adjustments are and the confusion for businesses on how to proceed in different scenarios.

At Sovos we’ve seen more local tax authority audits focused on clarifying if the treatment is valid from a corporate income tax and a VAT perspective.

After a review of the contracts and agreements between the companies and subsidiaries involved, it’s essential to understand whether the transfer pricing adjustments are:

Take Action

Speak to our team if you have questions about the latest approach from a VAT perspective on transfer pricing adjustments in Italy, the EU and the UK and the potential solutions to mitigate any risk of audit and penalties.

Understanding European VAT Compliance

Your guide to making VAT compliance simple

There are many elements to understanding European VAT compliance; our tax experts continually review regulations, compliance rules and tax authority updates to understand VAT requirements across Europe and beyond. This e-book is the result of their research and is ready for you to download. It’s ideal for anyone involved in VAT compliance who is keen to learn more.

  • Helps you to understand VAT
  • Covers over 40 jurisdictions within and outside the EU
  • Download for free

Navigating cross-border and understanding European VAT compliance can be complicated. With requirements varying from country to country it’s important to be prepared for any upcoming changes to ensure continued compliance. The digitization of VAT continues, and our guide will help you understand and be ready for changes including SAF-T, e-invoicing and continuous transaction controls (CTCs).

Quick Links

  1. What this Guide to understanding European VAT Compliance covers
  2. What is VAT compliance?
  3. What is a VAT number in Europe?
  4. Need help with VAT compliance now? Get in touch
  5. More VAT compliance resources

Minimise compliance risks

Essential VAT Guide

Including latest VAT trends

What this guide to understanding European VAT compliance covers

The guide provides information on understanding European VAT compliance including some of the biggest trends in VAT – CTCs and e-invoicing. We also look at some of the more complex VAT requirements including Intrastat, supply chain management, the EU e-commerce VAT package and VAT for events – all in one easy to understand e-book:

  • What is VAT?
  • The global tax landscape
  • VAT reporting
  • What is SAF-T?
  • What are CTCs?
  • Optimising supply chain management
  • The EU E-Commerce VAT Package
  • What is Intrastat?
  • VAT for events
  • Global and Europe VAT reporting requirements
  • How Sovos can help

What is VAT compliance?

VAT compliance means ensuring that VAT is applied and submitted in the correct format and by the relevant deadline to the relevant tax authority.

Each Member State has its own VAT invoicing and reporting requirements. Member States have been introducing e-invoicing, continuous transaction controls and SAF-T, all requiring specific data and formats to submit to the tax authority.

VAT requirements continue to change so it’s important to be aware of upcoming regulations and prepare in advance to remain compliant with the latest requirements.

Understanding European VAT compliance
VAT is a tax on final consumption, therefore it should not represent a cost to most businesses. VAT is more efficient and less detrimental to economic growth and competitiveness than other taxes

What is a VAT number in Europe?

To obtain a VAT number a company must register for VAT in the EU. Registering for VAT in the EU remains a complicated task, with each Member State having bespoke processes and procedures to obtain a VAT number. VAT reporting includes many elements, from registration to fiscal representation and filing returns. This guide explains the VAT reporting process, as well as upcoming changes that organisations should be aware of to remain VAT compliant.

Need help with VAT compliance now? Get in touch

End-to-end, technology-enabled VAT Managed Services ease your compliance workload and mitigate risk wherever you operate today while ensuring you’re ready to handle the VAT requirements in the markets you intend to dominate tomorrow.

Sovos Managed Services can help with a range of VAT compliance requirements, including:
  • Registration – guidance on country-specific registration requirements to avoid delays
  • Audits – minimise management time, fees and exposure to penalties or interest
  • Filing VAT returns – ensure VAT returns are in the correct format and include information required by tax authorities
  • Managing VAT changes – navigate changes to minimise risk and ensure continued compliance with the latest regulations and updates
  • Consultancy services – always on-hand to advise and help with queries of any complexity
Understanding European VAT compliance

Give yourself VAT compliance peace of mind.

Ease your VAT compliance workload and mitigate risk wherever you trade with Sovos’ complete end-to-end offering, enabled by our comprehensive software, helping you stay up to date and reducing the burden on your team.

There are many taxes (IPT) and parafiscal charges levied on insurance premiums throughout Europe. As a consequence of the lack of tax harmonisation, no general rules can be applied to establish which taxes exist in which countries and how to calculate the correct IPT amounts.

Some insurers do not have a dedicated IPT team; this is usually the case with smaller insurers. This could lead to IPT miscalculation and can trigger penalties. Without the proper and up-to-date knowledge, it is easy to be lost in the rules and regulations.

The following blog gives an overview of the tax calculation methods highlighting some unique elements of the IPT calculation.

Tax calculations methods

There are two basic tax calculation methods in the European IPT world

  1. Percentage of the premium
  2. Fixed amounts

In the first instance, there is a tax rate. For example in Bulgaria (2%) businesses can easily determine the tax amount by multiplying the taxable basis with this tax rate. Fortunately, several IPT calculations are based on this so-called basic rate model.

While in the second case, the local regulations determine the tax amount which needs to be settled on the insurance policies. Irish Stamp Duty can be mentioned as an example.

One can say that this is not rocket science. Furthermore, it is easy. These calculation models are just the basics. IPT regulations are built on these basic models adding several specific rules making the IPT calculations fairly complex. Here are some examples of these specific rules:

Reverse tax calculation

To add further colour to this topic, we can mention that reversing a policy line in the calculation does not always result in the same tax amount in a negative position. The best example is Malta, where the same amount of Stamp Duty is not refunded when the policy is cancelled after the cooling-off period. Instead of getting back the same stamp duty paid, an additional EUR 2.33 Stamp duty is triggered if certain conditions are met.

Although this is a unique regulation this highlights that when it comes to reversing a policy line, it is strongly recommended to check the rules beforehand and clarify whether or not the negative IPT can be offset or reclaimed and adjust the calculation method accordingly.

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IPT calculation requires detailed knowledge of the rules and regulations. Sovos has a dedicated team of compliance experts to walk you through even the most challenging calculations. Contact our team today.

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SAF-T: An Introduction to the International Standard

Understanding the flexible SAF-T international standards adopted by Austria, France, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Norway, Portugal and Romania

SAF-T (Standard Audit File for Tax) is an international standard for the electronic reporting of accounting data from organisations to a national tax authority or external auditors used by tax administrations to gather granular data from businesses either on demand or periodically.

The SAF-T standard has been adopted in mostly European countries, alleviating the need for tax authorities to physically visit companies to extract and review wide-ranging corporate data.

This e-book includes:

  • What is SAF-T? – an exploration of the standard and its origins
  • A deeper dive of the SAF-T format – the current datasets and data requirements
  • The challenges of SAF-T for businesses – the flexibility and wider use of the standard
  • The future of SAF-T – what’s next?
  • How Sovos can help

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Countries that have introduced legislation to enforce SAF-T requirements include Austria, France, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Norway, Poland, Portugal and Romania. SAF-T requirements are continuing to be adopted in a number of EU Member States and countries in other regions are actively considering introducing it.

The latest SAF-T standard includes accounting, accounts receivable, accounts payable, fixed assets and inventory datasets. In most cases authorities request a text file on an XML structure.

The SAF-T guideline is flexible, enabling governments to freely adapt SAF-T to suit their tax filing and audit systems, to perform audits, or as a basis for prefiling periodic tax declarations such as VAT returns or inventory statements.

This e-book discusses the introduction of SAF-T back in 2005 and how the standard has evolved since then, as well as the challenges of SAF-T for both businesses and governments.

How Sovos can help with SAF-T compliance

Sovos helps customers manage their SAF-T requirements across multiple jurisdictions through software solutions that automate the processes to seamlessly extract required data, map data accurately to SAF-T structures in the latest legal formats and perform deep analysis on the SAF-T output generated.

Sovos provides certainty with a future-proof strategy for tackling compliance obligations across all markets as VAT regulations evolve toward continuous e-reporting and other continuous transaction controls requiring increasingly granular data. Sovos’ solution for SAF-T combines extraction, analysis and generation providing our customers with the certainty they need.

Experience end-to-end handling with compliance peace of mind with Sovos.

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Compliance Mandates Around the World Have Elevated the Importance of Tax

Sorting out indirect tax issues was not traditionally at the top of any IT organisation’s to-do list. Today that’s changed and new VAT compliance mandates being introduced at an increasing rate around the world have elevated its status.

It’s more important than ever that IT decision makers and in-house tax and finance professionals engage and have meaningful, strategic discussions about how – and also why – to accelerate their digital transformation. This will enable them to not only respond but also to prepare for invasive new tax mandates.

Each time a product or service is sold in a new country or under the watchful eye of evolving national tax regimes, enterprises must respond. They must ensure their VAT recognition and reporting processes are aligned to new and evolving mandates for continuous controls on e-invoicing and other critical sales and purchase processes and documents.

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A cascade of tax compliance mandates

Multinational companies continue to leverage new technologies to optimise borderless supply chains. The spectacular growth of e-commerce and a new generation of technologies is opening global markets for even the smallest of micro-enterprises.

Global businesses and supply chains increasingly intersect new national mandates. Many of these mandates impose sophisticated real-time controls on business transactions and make compliance more complex than it’s ever been before. And the cost of non-compliance can be high.

Non-compliance can affect an organisation in many ways – financial, operational, employee productivity, customer experience, legal, and even brand perception.

IT, tax and finance teams need to communicate and collaborate effectively to fully understand their compliance obligations in each of the markets where they operate. If they can’t companies will likely find their digital transformations inhibited by disparate local point solutions that can be so entrenched, they can become impossible to replace.

With better collaboration between functions and alignment on tax, your entire organisation can achieve real operational efficiencies.

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  • The opportunities that exist when tax and IT work together
  • How joined up thinking can reduce risk and uncover opportunities
  • A shared vision and modern tax solution
  • How better conversations drive a better compliance process

As  tax compliances becomes increasingly interconnected with core business processes, organisations must make all aspects of tax reporting central to, and integrated with, core business activities.

A modern tax compliance solution must be engineered from the ground up to handle modern regulatory mandates. This especially applies to global manufacturers and retailers that do business in numerous countries around the world and must comply with mandates established by hundreds of tax authorities.

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Preparing for France’s Mandatory Continuous Transaction Controls in 2024

France is now moving towards continuous transaction controls (CTCs), introducing mandatory e-invoicing coupled with e-reporting.

The trend towards CTCs is global, and France is one of many countries to join this journey. As with previous CTC reforms in other countries, fiscal and economic gains are expected for both the government and businesses, such as:

  • Fighting fraud and bridging the VAT gap (€10 – 15 billion per year in France)
  • Reducing invoice processing costs for companies
  • Monitoring the economic activity in the country
  • Increase efficiency
  • Automating part of the VAT reporting process

Along with this, France is implementing an e-invoicing and e-reporting mandate. This is alongside the B2G e-invoicing obligation that is already mandatory.

The new French framework foresees a public platform as the recipient of data from e-invoices and e-reports. On top of this, a central directory will keep track of the invoice lifecycle, including payment status.

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Rollout dates

From July 2024 to January 2026, France will implement mandatory e-invoicing via a central platform and connected service providers as well as a complementary e-reporting obligation.

With these comprehensive requirements, alongside the B2G e-invoicing obligation that is already mandatory, the government aims to increase efficiency, cut costs, and fight fraud.

This extended timeline is welcomed by many companies, providing more time to better understand and prepare for the far-reaching consequences of this reform for their business processes, IT systems and tax compliance strategy.

However, businesses should start preparing now. Here are the key dates:

From 1 July 2024
All companies headquartered or with established operations in France will have to accept e-invoices through the CTC system from their suppliers.

Issuing e-invoices according to the CTC regime will become mandatory for the largest enterprises (some 300 entities).

The e-invoicing mandate does not apply to B2C and cross-border invoices though there is  an obligation to report those transactions.

From 1 January 2025
The same e-invoice issuance and e-reporting obligation will apply to a further 8,000 mid-sized companies – “Entreprises de taille intermédiaire”

From 1 January 2026
All remaining medium and small companies will be in scope of the mandate.

How can businesses prepare for the mandate?

The mandate presents challenges for businesses. There is a lot to consider, and most businesses current IT and manual processes aren’t equipped to handle this change.

The French e-invoicing mandate is still evolving and there are many elements remaining before the scheme is introduced.

In this e-book, we will cover in depth how business can achieve compliance:

  • An overview of the French mandate
  • The latest update to the timeline
  • Partner Dematerialization Platform (PDP) registration requirements
  • What’s on the horizon for the French Mandate
  • Challenges for your organisation – what buyers and suppliers need to consider to prepare their business processes
  • How Sovos can help businesses prepare for France’s e-invoicing mandate

Many businesses will need help to achieve compliance with the new mandate.

Sovos has unmatched experience with continuous transaction controls and e-invoicing mandates all over the world. Our scalable global platform has evolved to encompass new mandates, handling the needs of today, and the future.

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Managed Services for VAT Compliance

Many multinational companies find VAT compliance challenging, especially when trading cross-border.
With the increase in real-time reporting across Europe and differing VAT registration and reporting requirements, VAT compliance now requires significant resources and specialist knowledge to ensure compliance and avoid costly penalties.
As your business expands, so do your VAT obligations. This is why many organisations, turn to managed service providers to ease the burden of VAT compliance, audits and fiscal representation.
This e-book discusses the many elements of VAT compliance including:

Download a copy of the VAT managed services e-book

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How JD Sports manage VAT compliance with Sovos’ Managed Services

John Dowd, Indirect Tax Manager at sport-fashion retailer JD Sports discusses how he managed cross-border VAT compliance with the help of Sovos’ managed services

“For us at JD Sports and me personally I’m looking for a partnership, something long term, as it takes time and costs money to change advisors. I’m looking for a long-term relationship over a number of years with a VAT service provider.

“I want my advisor to have specialist knowledge, for us that’s retail and cross-border supply chains, overseas tax authorities, and I want to see new talent joining the team. I prefer a single point of contact to make it easier to move things along and of course, competitive pricing, and Sovos ticked all of these boxes for us.”

John Dowd, Indirect Tax Manager at JD Sports

The many elements of VAT compliance

VAT compliance has many elements, beginning with an understanding of place of supply rules to determine where VAT registration is required. Fiscal representation might be required to register in EU Member States.

Once VAT registration is underway, the next step is to determine EU VAT obligations by mapping the supply chain for the country of registration. There are also additional requirements to consider including exemptions, recovering VAT, Intrastat and varying continuous transaction controls (CTCs) mandates.

Submitting VAT returns to ensure compliance is a never-ending process. Each country has its own VAT return regulations and additional declaration requirements.

The VAT compliance cycle also includes preparation for VAT audits. Tax authorities can carry out audits for a variety of reasons so it’s important businesses prepare for audits and ensure they are able to manage the process successfully.

How Sovos VAT Managed Services can help with VAT compliance

Sovos’ end-to-end, technology-enabled VAT Managed Services can ease your compliance workload and mitigate risk where-ever you operate today, while ensuring you’re ready to handle the VAT requirements in the markets you intend to dominate tomorrow.

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Simplify EU VAT with IOSS

The EU E-Commerce VAT Package came into effect on 1 July 2021. And with it, the need for operational change, business disruption and plenty of accounting complexity.

A key component of the package is the Import One Stop Shop (IOSS) – a new way for companies to meet their EU VAT obligations when trading cross-border. 

In this e-book we explain IOSS’s key concepts and common use cases so you can better understand and take advantage of IOSS and how you apply it to your business.

IOSS is expansive, complicated and rewrites the rules for companies selling into and within Europe. This e-book aims to simplify that for you. We cover:

  • The basics
  • Intermediary requirements
  • Key considerations for your business
  • How to ensure IOSS compliance
  • How we can help

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We spend ample time on each of these topics so that you feel confident understanding whether IOSS is the right option for your business.

Our e-book starts with an easy-to-understand primer on IOSS. This includes how IOSS operates, its many rules and what has happened. The e-book also explains more on IOSS intermediaries as well as their purpose and when they can be used.

Find out more about the IOSS registration process, including its effects on:

  • Customer experience
  • VAT registration
  • VAT simplification
  • Record keeping
  • Data collection and invoicing
  • Contingency planning
  • Commercial matters

We answer some important questions you should consider about IOSS registration:

  1. Will you need to appoint an intermediary?

  2. How will you appoint one?

  3. How will you get set up for IOSS registration – will you do this yourself or search for help?

  4. How will you submit monthly returns and pay the VAT or use a partner?

  5. How can you ensure record keeping data is in the right format and up to date?

  6. How will you respond to tax authority audits?

Whatever your eventual IOSS decision is, our e-book will help you make an informed decision for the good of your business.

Compliance peace of mind with a complete, global VAT Managed Service from Sovos

Whatever your VAT implications, Sovos has the expertise to help you navigate your global events and the complexities of cross-border VAT obligations.

Our VAT Managed Services ease your compliance workload while mitigating risk wherever you operate today. In addition, we ensure you’re ready to handle the VAT requirements in the markets you intend to lead tomorrow.

Indirect Tax Rules for Insurance Across the World

Many tax authorities are increasing their focus on the insurance industry in an effort to close tax revenue gaps, with many introducing Insurance Premium Tax (IPT) and other indirect taxes for insurance. Globally, IPT is fragmented across over 200+ countries and achieving compliance can be a complex process requiring specialist knowledge.

Insurers, especially those operating across multiple territories, can find keeping up to date with the latest IPT rates, rules and regulations to ensure compliance challenging.

This guide provides a helpful snapshot of the indirect tax rules that apply to insurance premiums across the world, including:

  • Europe
  • Asia
  • Africa
  • Australia and New Zealand
  • North America
  • South America

Download the Indirect Tax Rules for Insurance Across the World guide

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The guide provides a useful reference of indirect rules across Europe including:

Albania, Andorra, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Gibraltar, Greece, Guernsey, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Isle of Man, Italy, Jersey, Kosovo, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Monaca, Montenegro, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, San Marino, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, United Kingdom

And across Asia including:

Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Kazakhstan, Korea (the Republic of) (South), Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Macau, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan (Province of China), Thailand, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, Vietnam

Across Africa including:

Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Gambia, Ghana, Kenya, Libya, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Saint Helena, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe

For Australia and New Zealand including:

American Samoa, Australia, Fiji, French Polynesia, Marshall Islands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Wallis et Futuna

Across North America including:

Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Aruba, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Canada, Cayman Islands, Costa Rica, Curacao, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Greenland, Guatemala, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Puerto Rico, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin (French part), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, United States of America, Virgin Islands

And, finally, the indirect tax rules for insurance across South America including:

Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Ecuador, Falkland Islands, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela

Insurance Premium Tax compliance

The digitization of tax is a trend that will undoubtedly continue. Organisations need to prepare for any changes to reporting as this will impact compliance obligations for the countries they operate in.

Tax authorities have increased their focus on the insurance industry to ensure IPT and parafiscal taxes are collected correctly, accurately, and on time.

Operating in multiple countries inevitably means also having to comply with many local regulations in line with IPT statutory and parafiscal filing. Compliance regimes can be simple or complex, but the difficulty is that they’re varied.

Download our guide to ease this burden.

Faced with a VAT gap of nearly €13 billion, France is introducing mandatory e-invoicing for business-to-business (B2B) transactions from 2023, as well as e-reporting of additional data types. Applying to all companies established or, for e-reporting, VAT-registered in France, this new mandate is complex. It will also require significant planning.

According to the ICC, businesses will need at least 12-18 months to prepare for such continuous transaction control (CTC) mandates so it’s clearly important to start planning now to prepare for the change.

This infographic provides answers to your pressing points surrounding the mandate including:

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Mandate aim

The aim of the new mandate is to increase efficiency, cut costs and fight fraud via access to more transaction data. All B2B invoices will need to be transmitted through a central platform. This is either directly or via registered service providers connected to the platform.

The new mandate will provide the French tax authority with access to all VAT relevant data related to B2C and B2B transactions, so it’s crucial to adjust your business systems and processes to avoid penalties and fines.

France is the latest country to adopt CTCs, as tax authorities across the world look to gain greater insight and close the VAT gap. The proposed requirements come into effect during the years 2023-2025.

 

France e-invoice and e-reporting rollout dates

1 January 2023: Large companies will be subject to the B2B e-invoice clearance and e-reporting mandate. There is no real-time transmission requirement for B2C and cross-border invoices. However there is an obligation to e-report these periodically so that the tax administration has full visibility. All companies must accept e-invoices under the new mandate from this moment onwards.

1 January 2024: E-invoice sending and the e-reporting obligations will apply for medium-sized companies.

1 January 2025: All companies will be in scope of the mandate by 1 January 2025.

 

How Sovos can help

As France looks set to become the next country in Europe to introduce CTCs with its B2B e-invoicing and e-reporting mandate in 2023, it’s crucial that businesses prepare for and understand their new VAT obligations.

Sovos serves as a true one-stop-shop for managing all e-invoicing compliance obligations in France and across the globe. Sovos uniquely combines local excellence with a seamless, global customer experience.

Our scalable, end-to-end solution ensures e-invoicing and e-reporting compliance in France and additionally in 60+ other countries.

Sovos is purpose built for modern tax – an evolving, complex landscape in which global tax authorities are requiring increased visibility and control into business processes, in many cases at the transaction level.

Tax authorities around the globe have embraced digitization to speed up revenue collection and reduce fraud while closing tax gaps. This is the catalyst for companies to move complete, connected and continuous tax compliance software into their digital financial core.

Understanding VAT Obligations: European Events

Global events are popular once again and conferences and exhibitions often create VAT registration obligations in different European Union Member States that your business operates in.

Navigating these complex place of supply rules can be challenging. Legislation varies country-to-country and the type of event you’re organising affects this. Download our helpful guide to understand what your VAT obligations are.

Place of Supply Rules

When determining where tax applies to an event, it’s important to consider the place of supply rules.

These can be confusing and hard to interpret. When organising events and conferences, there are two basic rules to think about:

  1. Does the service being supplied fall under the general place of supply rules, in which case, if the supply is B2B, VAT is due where the customer is based. In this scenario if the customer is established outside the UK, then the customer has to account for VAT on behalf of the supplier in the country they are established in under the reverse charge rules in the EU or potentially equivalent if non-EU.
  2. Does the supply fall under any of the exceptions to the main rule? The most common example being admission to conferences and events whereby VAT is due where the event is held.

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As you can see, VAT and events is a complex affair.

Admission to events, exhibitions and conferences in the EU is subject to VAT in the country where the event takes place. In addition to admission, other considerations include stand rental, local suppliers, sponsorship packages and catering services.

Our guide covers these topics:

  • VAT registration – where should I register and what VAT rules should I consider?
  • Event organisers – what VAT liabilities apply and how does it affect clients?
  • Online events – how do the rules differ for online events, both for B2B and B2C?
  • Hybrid events – are these taxed differently?
  • VAT reclaims – what claims are possible and what VAT can I recover?

Tour operators margin scheme (TOMS)

In addition to these common concerns, the Sovos Understanding VAT Obligations: European Events guide also explores TOMS – the tour operators margin scheme.

If a business buys in and sells services such as hotel accommodation, passenger transport or excursions to its clients/delegates in its own name, TOMS may well apply. The supply of services that fall under the scheme receive a different tax treatment to most supplies of services. They can require the undertaking of a complex calculation.

Also covered is a summary of non-EU events and how to apply VAT when hosting an event outside of the European Union.

For example, some non-EU countries will apply similar rules to the EU and a registration may be

Needed. However the issues will often be complex and require a business to carefully consider the organisation of the event at the outset. VAT recovery in non-EU countries will also vary and not all countries will allow refunds to overseas businesses.  

Compliance peace of mind with a complete, global VAT Managed Service from Sovos

Whatever your VAT implications, Sovos has the expertise to help you navigate your global events and the complexities of cross-border VAT obligations. Our VAT Managed Services ease your compliance workload while mitigating risk wherever you operate today. In addition, we ensure you’re ready to handle the VAT requirements in the markets you intend to lead tomorrow.

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